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50 to 60 or 60 to 70

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50 to 60 or 60 to 70

Old 06-07-2006, 12:19 PM
  #1  
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Default 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

I am in the market for a new bow. Going to go with the Allegiance unless bowtech comes out with the old glory in 27.5 inch draw next year. Anyhow I shoot at 60pounds and most of the bows in the shops are 60 to 70.
Is shooting at the low end of the range less effiecient? Should I have the 50 to 60# ordered?I know there was a post about this before just could not find it.
Thanks for the thoughts


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Old 06-07-2006, 12:41 PM
  #2  
RWK
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

You always want to be near the top of the rating for best results. Rich
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Old 06-07-2006, 01:21 PM
  #3  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

Will the deer get any deader for having gone up in weight ?
You already shoot where you're comfortable , and you're already at the top of the range for the bow you shoot , if it ain't broke ...
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Old 06-07-2006, 02:18 PM
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

The so called rule of thumb says to shoot at the max poundage but I wonder some times if that rule still applies to modern bows like Bowtechs. When I look at mine with locking pivoting limb pockets I think I would need to see some actual lab tests to prove that theory to me. And really with the speed of the new bows now I bought a 60lb max this time since I know people who have taken 1000 lb moose with that setup with no problems at all. I hunt moose, deer and black bear and don't feel undergunned at all.
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Old 06-07-2006, 02:38 PM
  #5  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

He's not asking if he should go up in pounds. He's staying at 60 pounds, he just wants to know if he should get the 50-60 or 60-70, which would be more efficient.
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Old 06-08-2006, 05:27 AM
  #6  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

ORIGINAL: Dairy King

He's not asking if he should go up in pounds. He's staying at 60 pounds, he just wants to know if he should get the 50-60 or 60-70, which would be more efficient.
That is correct, sir. I am going to stay at 60#, maybe sneek up to 61 or 62 since my arrows are at about 310 grs. Bowtech give a range for the ibo speeds of the bows, I was wondering if it had anything to do with what I am asking about or just variations from bow to bow.
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Old 06-08-2006, 06:04 AM
  #7  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

i agree with TerryM. older bows with uprigh limbs with the limbs backed out will increase brace heigh thus reducing arrow speed, less efficient??? or just slower. my Alleg. at 60.6lbs and 300gr shaft has the same speed as B.C. at 70.6 and 350gr.shaft. what defines efficient?
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Old 06-08-2006, 06:28 AM
  #8  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

There was a thread here a few weeks ago where someone was actually shooting faster with a 70#er dropped down than an equal bow maxed at 60#.

Easy enough to shoot both set-ups before putting the cash down.

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Old 06-08-2006, 08:07 AM
  #9  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

I shoot 60# on a T29 with the 70# for two years. I then changed to the 60# and seemed more efficient. I don't have a chrono, but it seemed I gained some speed. My friend even said so. If you can, try both setup to see if there is any difference.
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Old 06-08-2006, 08:38 AM
  #10  
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Default RE: 50 to 60 or 60 to 70

Get the 50-60 but don't try and squeeze a couple more pounds out of the poor bow by burying the limb bolts. This is a pet peeve of mine and you just poked a stick into my sore spot.

It's really not a smart idea. For one thing, you're not going to gain any speed by doing it. Actually, it's very possible it could even cost you speed.

Now, it's going to look like I'm changing the subject, but I'm not. This is very much interrelated with your question.

I've been preaching dynamic tiller on this forum for years now. Bottoming out the limb bolts practically eliminates the possibility of achieving a decent dynamic tiller. Measuring from the string to the limb butts at brace height is static tiller, a starting point. Dynamic tiller is how the limbs balance during the draw and the shot, and it also takes your unique shooting form into account.

Here's what I recommend to get the best performing, most accurate, most forgiving, easiest holding, easiest tuning, smoothest drawing, smoothest shooting, quietest bow possible.

Bottom out your limb bolts then back them off one full turn each. Aim a sight pin at a spot on the wall and slowly draw the bow. If the bow wants to pull the pin up off the spot, back off the top bolt and/or crank down the bottom bolt. If it wants to pull the pin down off the spot, back off the bottom bolt and/or crank down on the top bolt. Keep adjusting and drawing until you can slowly draw the bow to anchor and the pin naturally stays close to the spot.

That's probably not the 'correct' way to set dynamic tiller, but it's simple and it works fine. And while this adjustment is probably more crucial for dual cam bows, I have found that it's practically just as important for single cam bows. Upright limbs, parallel limbs, it don't matter. The limbs' draw forces need to be adjusted to perfectly match each other and your grip/shooting style or you're not going to get the very best your bow is capable of giving you.

THEN, if you want to shoot at the bow's peak weight, crank the limb bolts down, making absolutely sure you turn each bolt exactly the same amount to preserve your tiller setting. One bolt or the other probably won't be bottomed out, but that's the way it is. It's not going to cost a single thing in speed. In fact, it might even help you gain speed by balancing the limbs' thrust.

When I begin tuning a bow, setting the tiller is where I start. If my bow winds up being a pound or two under it's peak weight, I don't care. I know it's going to tune a lot easier, hold on target MUCH better, be more forgiving, shoot a lot sweeter and shoot just as fast, or faster, than it would if I'd just buried the limb bolts.
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