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-   -   To fix or not to fix (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/sporting-dogs/185937-fix-not-fix.html)

sprock 03-25-2007 07:13 PM

To fix or not to fix
 
I just rescued an English Pointer from our local animal shelter and I was just wondering if having her fixed would hinder her hunting abilities? Some say yes and some say no, can anyone clear this up for me?

Rich Baker 03-26-2007 04:31 AM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
If she came from a shelter she's already fixed. Thats the first thng they do.

sprock 03-26-2007 07:32 AM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
No, she is not fixed .They didn't do it at the shelter and I'm not to sure why. They are suppose too. All I have to do is make a appointment for her and that is why I asked the question.

Feistman 03-26-2007 04:24 PM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
It won't hinder a thing.

outdoorslover 03-26-2007 07:29 PM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
I got my English Setter from an animal rescue. To adopt him you had to fix him soI had no choice. It hasn't hurt him a bit. He hunts as hard as he can and hunts well. Furthermore, he no longer sprays things and he is friendlier for some reason. Don't worry about it. If he is from a shelter, I'm guessing he doesn't have papers(which my dog doesn't) so you can't breed him.

Dogs from shelters can be timid. They need to be loved and socialized very well before you hunt over them. It took me about 1 1/2 years to get my dog ready to hunt. Be careful in his training.

SWOSUMike 03-26-2007 09:21 PM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 

ORIGINAL: outdoorslover

If he is from a shelter, I'm guessing he doesn't have papers(which my dog doesn't) so you can't breed him.

That's not true. If a dog is not fixed and you own him, you can breed him all you want papers or not. Registries have no authority over dog owners who are not members of the registry. -MIKE

CDover 03-27-2007 02:43 PM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
Not one bit my 6yrs old GSP is a machine......All she wants to do is Hunt birds,chase a tennis ball and eat... in that order. She was fixed at 6 months old....

RedBeard5289 03-27-2007 08:07 PM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
If memory serves, I believe thatsome shelters neuter/spay all pets that are up for adoption so that they don't get "repeat business" from that pet. Especially if that pet runs away, abandoned or comes up with an unplanned pregnancy.
Now some shelter have you pay extra for an unneutered/unspayed pet with the understanding that when you get the pet fixed you will be partially reimbursed by the shelter upon providing them documentation that the pet has been fixed. I believe this is money issue for some shelters since they can't afford to get every animal the take in fixed.
This is what happen when we adopted our family cat (wife's idea not mine). He was 8-12 weeks old and not fixed. I think we paid $65 for him and after we got him neutered and showed the shelter the paperwork from the vet we got $25-30 bucks back. After he healed he was back to his usual energetic, inquizative self prior to the visit to the vet.
Side note also, My brother's dog was fixed after straying one to many times from the farm for some late night romance and he is still energetic and eager to hunt as ever. If anything I think the neutering calmed him down bit to make him easier to train and work with.

Just my two cents!
RedBeard5289

Phil from Maine 03-28-2007 08:28 AM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 

That's not true. If a dog is not fixed and you own him, you can breed him all you want papers or not. Registries have no authority over dog owners who are not members of the registry. -MIKE
Maybe that way in your area, but, here if you choose not to fix it they will come and claim it back as it would be part of an agreement to have it fixed. For as far as hunting goes I do not see where it will matter much.

Mite 03-29-2007 05:22 AM

RE: To fix or not to fix
 
Personally, I would have her spayed. The only real difference you will find is how other dogs will react to her. If left intact, you'll probably find other intact females being aggressive towards her and males trying to dominate. Not something you'd want in the field. As to hunting ability, I haven't seen nor heard of anything negative against spaying.


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