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-   -   Dog for multiple purposes? (https://www.huntingnet.com/forum/small-game-predator-trapping/420613-dog-multiple-purposes.html)

Vodevil27 03-25-2019 05:25 AM

Dog for multiple purposes?
 
Hey everybody,
I am new to hunting, but I already know that I intend to get into multiple types of hunting. I'm also a dog lover, so I want to combine the two.
I know I want to squirrel hunt, rabbit hunt, and shed hunt. I am thinking I might want to branch out into coon or even small game birds at some point.
I'm having trouble picking a dog breed. Logically I know that I will probably have greater success if I pick beagles for rabbits and a feist for squirrels and a coonhound for coon and a spaniel for the game birds, but is there a breed that is versatile enough to do it all? Or at least more than one thing?
I have read that you can't train a single dog for rabbit and squirrel as it confuses them on the hunt, how true is that?

Does anybody have any feedback on how Catahoula Leopard Dogs do at any of these? I am attracted to that breed because they are touted as multifunction, and they have the benefit of also being a willing and capable guard and they are big enough for the other dog activities I'd like to do, notably pulling a dog cart or carrying a dog backpack on hikes.

Thanks for any help

mrbb 03-25-2019 06:38 AM

I cannot say I know of anyone that has a dog that hunts squirrels and rabbits and then onto coons and upland game birds, BUt sure some dogs with enough drive and training can do it,
as you already know, the game animals your naming all have different ways of life and this is why some breeds do ONE type better than others, dogs that are runners like beagles and con dogs, tend to be HARD to have self control to hunt birds(upland game,) as they prefer to keep moving, your not going to get them IMO steady to a flush or shot

you will HAVE to be willing to have a dog that will never really be finished on anything, but just TRY hard at all
IF I was to pick a breed of dog that has a rep for being very multi talented it would be a The Deutsch Drahthaar,
they have been known to be very versatile dogs , take well to training and very durable dogs
not so sure about being a guard dog, but they are larger framed dogs, so< pending personality traits in the DOG itself may or may not have some drive there
ME personally I would NOT want a HUNTING dog to have ANY aggression in them due to while hunting your going to be running into far too many people, and or other animals, add in hiking and gets worse
a dog with aggression or more protection issue's can be a liability issue and a law suit wavering!
MOST all IMO GOOD hunting dogs are very laid back, relaxed and super friendly dogs, that get along with others and other dogs and animals
my last Lab, knew its owner had guns and as such, he was friendly to everything and everyone, NOT a mean bone in his body, and that was perfect to me!, anyone could pull food out of his mouth and he would never EVER growl or fight, no worries about him ever biting anyone! yet he hunted with a ton of passion, and was a as great a friend as anyone could ever ask for
hunted all types of game too, but was best at upland game,, pheasants being #1 and as I wanted it!


I personally would ask myself what animal I want to hunt MOST however and pick a do that does that best, and live with doing the rest IF so or not
get a second dog! or third dog if you need more specialized for species/guard duty!
and I sure hope you realize how much work is involved in training here, its a LOT and on many different levels, and species, your going to have to be making sure they got one down before moving on to next and then BACK again often so they stay on track of first and second species!
way more work than I am up for these days LOL

Vodevil27 03-25-2019 06:47 AM

That's a great reply, thank you. I wouldn't have considered the liability of a protective dog so I am glad you brought that up. I will take your advice.

grouch55 03-25-2019 02:05 PM

A good Labrador treated right will hunt most anything for their best buddy !!! Like the old saying I can do everything but nothing great

MudderChuck 03-25-2019 05:25 PM

It is really hard to get it all in one package. You may live your whole life and have multiple dogs and still not find the perfect pooch.

IMO the herding dogs come the closest. They almost by definition have to be good communicators with humans. Nose dominant is also a plus.

I had a Warmeraner that was good at hunting varied game. He was nose dominant, had a strong prey drive, was an excellent personal protection dog. He was kind of a bone head and some of his training was pretty intense. He pointed instinctively. And his nose was unbelievable, I mean superpower unbelievable. I watched him wake from a deep sleep and point a Fox at four hundred yards.

The best all around dog I ever had was a Black Mouth Cur female. If I was able to communicate what I wanted she'd try her darndest to give it to me. It was almost like telepathy. I taught her to point Rattlesnakes, IMO this was an indicator she could be taught anything.

Instead of trying to turn my dog into what I want it to be, I watch closely, learn it's strong points and modify my hunting to fit its talents. Example, I have a Plummer Terrier I take Pheasant hunting. I keep him on a leash until I get close to a likely spot and then turn him loose to flush. He is really good at finding the stay at home Pheasants that refuse to flush and play hide and seak in the hedgerows. I almost always shoot more birds than anybody else. Some Pheasnat flush far away before a pointer can get anywhere near them. Some are textbook and the pointers fix them. Just as many or more hide in the thick bush where the larger dogs can't go and creep through the underbrush, this is where my Terrier excels.

coyotejim 04-27-2019 05:51 AM

I have hunted in Europe behind Deutsch Drahthaar, German Shorthair and Wirehaired Pointers. We hunted everything from ducks to upland birds and big game. These dogs are about as versible as you can get. You must be willing to spend a lot of time training and even more time hunting them.

Mickey Finn 04-27-2019 07:25 AM


Originally Posted by Vodevil27 (Post 4353766)
Hey everybody,
I am new to hunting, but I already know that I intend to get into multiple types of hunting. I'm also a dog lover, so I want to combine the two.
I know I want to squirrel hunt, rabbit hunt, and shed hunt. I am thinking I might want to branch out into coon or even small game birds at some point.
I'm having trouble picking a dog breed. Logically I know that I will probably have greater success if I pick beagles for rabbits and a feist for squirrels and a coonhound for coon and a spaniel for the game birds, but is there a breed that is versatile enough to do it all? Or at least more than one thing?
I have read that you can't train a single dog for rabbit and squirrel as it confuses them on the hunt, how true is that?

Does anybody have any feedback on how Catahoula Leopard Dogs do at any of these? I am attracted to that breed because they are touted as multifunction, and they have the benefit of also being a willing and capable guard and they are big enough for the other dog activities I'd like to do, notably pulling a dog cart or carrying a dog backpack on hikes.

Thanks for any help

It really depends on how much dog you want. I had a DD and he hunted whatever you were going for. Staunch pointer, hell or high water retriever after force fetch training. He would tree squirrels and coons and did the best he could to bring rabbits back around for me. But he had nothing like an off switch and quiet evenings at home required a full day or two of active hunting. This dog was restless in the blind until the birds were coming in. Then he would freeze and hold his breath. He was protective of the house and the forest we were hunting in. Nobody ever snuck up on you that's for sure. He hated bears and coyotes and never passed up a chance to fill his face with porcupine quills. He never stole a game animal from a dog that was retrieving but if he saw someone holding a rabbit he would take it and bring it to me. Funny the first couple times. He would also bring me things he found in the forest. So, shed hunting might be possible too. But I never tried it. That's just one example of a very diverse and capable breed. If you can seriously handle that much dog then they are a good choice.

I've heard good things about Catahoula's but have not liked any of the ones I've seen in person. Another dog you could look at is the Black Mouthed Cur. I'd like to own one someday myself.

Good luck whatever you decide on.

mrbb 04-27-2019 07:45 AM


Originally Posted by Mickey Finn (Post 4355383)
It really depends on how much dog you want. I had a DD and he hunted whatever you were going for. Staunch pointer, hell or high water retriever after force fetch training. He would tree squirrels and coons and did the best he could to bring rabbits back around for me. But he had nothing like an off switch and quiet evenings at home required a full day or two of active hunting. This dog was restless in the blind until the birds were coming in. Then he would freeze and hold his breath. He was protective of the house and the forest we were hunting in. Nobody ever snuck up on you that's for sure. He hated bears and coyotes and never passed up a chance to fill his face with porcupine quills. He never stole a game animal from a dog that was retrieving but if he saw someone holding a rabbit he would take it and bring it to me. Funny the first couple times. He would also bring me things he found in the forest. So, shed hunting might be possible too. But I never tried it. That's just one example of a very diverse and capable breed. If you can seriously handle that much dog then they are a good choice.

I've heard good things about Catahoula's but have not liked any of the ones I've seen in person. Another dog you could look at is the Black Mouthed Cur. I'd like to own one someday myself.

Good luck whatever you decide on.

how high energy/strung a dog is, is really a dog to dog thing, NOT a breed in whole deal!
I have seen many that were very clam and mild mannered, and not high strung dogs at all, alot comes down to what mother nature gives them
breeding can help, with right lines, and many times its about WHAT you want in a dog line that you need to research

I have seen countless dogs of ALL breeds that were a hand full, that never seemed to have a OFF switch,
My last lab was awesome, he was about as calm and laid back a dog as there ever was, BOMBS could drop around him and he could lay still and or even sleep thru it
YET out in the hunting field, he had energy for ALL day hunts, never had quit in him at all!
but to sit at home, in , in a vehicle for 36+ hrs non stop, regular distractions in life, he could care less.
SO, I will NEVER label ANY breed as saying they can be a handful or expect ALL the higher energy problems some claim they have
as its NOT always true, it can go either way when buying blindly and or even after researching, some dogs just get genes that they cannot help themselves but to be balls of energy

and the opposite can be said too, GOOD Breeders do the best they can, to PICK traits they want in there lines, but there ain't no guarantee either way!
anyone getting a dog PERIOD< should do there home work and know what they want, what they MIGHT get and be prepared for everything in between! and they for sure should be honest about what they WILL put into the dog, training, time, and effort
and honestly IMO< most folks THINK they will do more and most end up NOT, I sadly seen way too many ill trained dogs, that IMO is ALL the owners fault and NOT the dogs or the breed of the dog!

can also say the same thing about a lot of folks kids LOL
ALL my dogs were better behaving than most folks kids or people I know! HAHA
but I spend thousands of hours training and getting them that way, and never once regretted doing it, they were pleasures to have around till there ends, which always came way too soon!
before buying./getting ANY dog, folks,
Please be really honest with yourself on what you can handle and will be doing with it, and WILL do, not just THINK you will! you owe it to the dog if not yourself!

kevin777 09-19-2019 08:55 AM

I am also advised to take the German Drachtaar, but I’m still thinking about how to train him. Himself or need to hire someone

Jack Ryan 09-20-2019 08:21 PM


Originally Posted by Vodevil27 (Post 4353766)
Hey everybody,
I am new to hunting, but I already know that I intend to get into multiple types of hunting. I'm also a dog lover, so I want to combine the two.
I know I want to squirrel hunt, rabbit hunt, and shed hunt. I am thinking I might want to branch out into coon or even small game birds at some point.
I'm having trouble picking a dog breed. Logically I know that I will probably have greater success if I pick beagles for rabbits and a feist for squirrels and a coonhound for coon and a spaniel for the game birds, but is there a breed that is versatile enough to do it all? Or at least more than one thing?
I have read that you can't train a single dog for rabbit and squirrel as it confuses them on the hunt, how true is that?

Thanks for any help

I have a German Wire Hair Pointer and he is a flat out, for real, paid pro at the bird preserve farms. Find, point, fetch, hold, no TV dog ever did it better. I got him because the professional guide who had him got out of it all, the dog got too old, and the zoning for keeping dogs in his neighborhood all seemed to converge on him at once. My house was suppose to be his retirement home.

We go back to the "bird farms" for fun and he can not see a bird for a year and step one foot on the place and it is like he just woke up from a dream and he is young again.

By the same token since he has come here, we hunt beavers, squirrels, rabbits, doves, what ever comes our way and he is as happy fetching a squirrel from across the hollar as he is a bird. Sit by me for hours watching and smelling for a beaver and go on full alert if anything shows up. I could probably take a nap and look up just by feeling him tense up beside me. He has fetched more than one dead beaver from 50 or 60 yards out in a big muddy beaver pond.

http://www.vommoorehaus.com/drahthaar.php


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