Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Firearms Forum > Reloading
 New to reloading? READ THIS FIRST! >

New to reloading? READ THIS FIRST!

Reloading Share techniques for reloading, where to get the hottest in reloading equipment and learn how to reload from fellow hunters.

New to reloading? READ THIS FIRST!

Old 01-10-2007, 02:59 PM
  #1  
Nontypical Buck
Thread Starter
 
mossy33oak's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: MD
Posts: 4,572
Default New to reloading? READ THIS FIRST!

Here is the list our group of guys from the forum have assembled, to help beginners get an idea of what is needed to start reloading. Please reference this list BEFORE making a post in the forum. If you have a question after reading this list, feel free to ask it.


1. Safety Glasses
2. Sturdy work bench.
3. Well - lit area.
4. Reloading manual(s). ($20-$25)
5. Powder, bullets, primers, casings
6. Press ($65-$115 press only)
7. Dies ($18-$50)
*8. Primer pocket cleaner ($5)
9. Case Lube (case lube and pad kit $17)
10. Case lube pad
11. Dial Calipers or Veneers ($20-$50 make sure it reads to .001")
12. Case trimmer & pilots ($50-$75 comes with pilots)
13. Powder scale (beam type $50)
14. Loading blocks ($5)
15. Powder funnel ($5)
16.Set of standard allen wrenches ($5-10)
*17. Hand priming tool ($40)
18. Deburring tool (Deburring chamfering tool combo $15)
*19. Flashole deburring tool ($10)

*Items with * are not necessarilyneeded, just highly recommended.
Prices were obtained from www.Cabelas.com as ageneralballpark figure, you may find these items cheaper elsewhere.


mossy33oak is offline  
Old 06-07-2011, 10:09 AM
  #2  
Fork Horn
 
BillBrasky's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Kansas
Posts: 120
Default

Do you think a chronograph (about $70) is vital for the process or are ballistics tables good enough for extrapolating muzzle velocity?
BillBrasky is offline  
Old 06-07-2011, 01:00 PM
  #3  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Maryland
Posts: 332
Default

Originally Posted by BillBrasky
Do you think a chronograph (about $70) is vital for the process or are ballistics tables good enough for extrapolating muzzle velocity?
Not vital in the least. I have two and rarely use em. I used to try to work up loads and chrono, you end up worrying about chrono alignment and not shooting as good as you should.
BCRules is offline  
Old 11-22-2011, 06:57 PM
  #4  
Spike
 
tankerchief's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 77
Default Thinking of getting started

Right now my uncle reloads my ammo for me; but I know at some point I'm going to have to turn to someone else or myself if I want to use re-loads.

I figure I will only be reloading maybe 100 rounds a year (30/06 & 30-30 win combined); would it be cost efficient to buy equipment or would I be better off finding someone to reload for me?

How about trying to find used equipment? Is that a possible option?

Thanks in advance.
tankerchief is offline  
Old 11-22-2011, 09:44 PM
  #5  
Nontypical Buck
 
Big Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: West NE
Posts: 1,455
Default

Originally Posted by tankerchief
only be reloading maybe 100 rounds a year...cost efficient...
How about trying to find used equipment? Is that a possible option?
.
If you buy 150gr federal soft points when they're on sale for 10 bucks a box, and your only reason to reload is to save money, it's probably not your cup o' tea. I can tell you I save 25+ a box vs comparable factory loads in my centerfires. If you went ultra caveman basic, you could pay for your loading equipment with a bottle of powder, a box of bullets, and a pack of primers.

Or, and this is the more likely option, you could wind up like the rest of us reloaders. First, you try to save money starting up. You're nervous to try out your first load, but it works out great. Heck, that's the best your rifle's ever shot. You'll try a different brew next time, after some more reading. Before you know it, you can't help yourself every time you see a deal on components. "5 bucks off on powder? Wellllll I suppose I'll grab a few of those. 8 bucks off a 100 pack of bullets? Heck, I better just clean the shelf of these babies. I'll need them eventually anyways. Primers..only a few bucks a hundred, I spose I'll pick up a few of those, just so they're handy. Ooooohh, that tool would make things easier! Maybe next time, after I replace those dangerously bald tires. But I do have this sale voucher. It wouldn't hurt to have I suppose."

This is a math problem. There won't always be people willing to take the risk of loading for somebody else. I know I won't load for anyone other than myself and close friends. So figure out equipment cost of equipment you want, and your ammo cost vs factory cost to make your decision.
Big Z is offline  
Old 11-23-2011, 06:39 AM
  #6  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: WY
Posts: 2,056
Default

Originally Posted by Big Z
If you buy 150gr federal soft points when they're on sale for 10 bucks a box, and your only reason to reload is to save money, it's probably not your cup o' tea.
+1

There's a lot in Z's post here that I'm guessing many reloaders will identify with, and it suggests a bit of the "journey" that reloading can be. It's pretty common that your early interest will focus on saving money ("by reloading, I can afford to shoot more," or "the only way I can shoot those premium bullets is to load them myself"). We all have bald tires from time-to-time, not to mention a household budget officer that doesn't necessarily see the merit in that fancy new electronic scale/powder dispenser, even if it is on sale. However, for most of us, the basic tools described above (and fortunately included in most "kits") are all many of us will ever need.

If you shoot competitively or if you're simply obsessive with your hunting loads, you will at some point find yourself going to the next level with your reloading - maybe not so much in terms of the tools, but certainly by way of paying more attention to the processes. Reloaders at this level generally know a LOT about their loads, as well as their firearms - from physical specifications all the way to performance. Shooters with specialized military shooting experience may be familiar with the use of data books and manually recording and refining their shooting data. But, for others, the most efficient - and quite possibly also the limit of their refinement will be achieved by use of a chronograph, an exterior ballistics program, and possibly a wind meter with environmentals (Kestrel or other).

Find your balance. What are your goals in reloading, how much time and mental activity can you devote to it, and what kind of budget do you expect? Recognize that what these are today will evolve tomorrow. Start out with the basics, work on your understanding of the forces at work and the measurements involved. Go as far as you feel necessary to achieve your objectives - you'll learn far more about what you and your rifle are capable of than most people will ever imagine.
homers brother is offline  
Old 12-22-2011, 02:51 AM
  #7  
Fork Horn
 
BRUSE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Granbury, TX
Posts: 481
Default

I looked long and hard for my set. I ended finding a used press, 6 sets of dies, a cabniet, and several scales at a yard sale for 40 bucks. I added some new scales and stuff but the dies and press are working great. I can't wait to work some loads up for my 280.
BRUSE is offline  
Old 12-22-2011, 06:00 PM
  #8  
Giant Nontypical
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Allegan, MI
Posts: 8,019
Default

Hey Brian---I didn't know you reloaded. That 4x4 muley I got a few weeks ago in Wyoming was my first with a reload and it tore his heart in half at 174 yards. Are you going to make it home from the sandbox before New Years day?
Topgun 3006 is offline  
Old 12-22-2011, 07:54 PM
  #9  
Fork Horn
 
BRUSE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Granbury, TX
Posts: 481
Default

Mike,
I hope to be back the the first or second week of jan. I used to reload alot for my 7mm then we moved several times and never sat it back up. I'll be learning again so it goes. I want to work some loads for my 25/06 also. Happy Holidays
BRUSE is offline  
Old 03-28-2013, 12:17 PM
  #10  
Spike
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Ohio
Posts: 21
Default

When I got my .222, it came with a set of dies. Is the resizing die the same as a trimming tool, or will i need the trimming tool as well? I am thinking about purchasing the stuff to get into reloading. Just wasn't sure on a few things.
UntouchableOutdoors is offline  

Quick Reply: New to reloading? READ THIS FIRST!


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.