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What Books Are You Reading?

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What Books Are You Reading?

Old 02-03-2022, 05:41 AM
  #31  
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Just started Braiding Sweetgrass by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Amazon summary

Drawing on her life as an indigenous scientist, and as a woman, Kimmerer shows how other living beings―asters and goldenrod, strawberries and squash, salamanders, algae, and sweetgrass―offer us gifts and lessons, even if we've forgotten how to hear their voices. In reflections that range from the creation of Turtle Island to the forces that threaten its flourishing today, she circles toward a central argument: that the awakening of ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings will we be capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learn to give our own gifts in return.
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Old 02-03-2022, 08:18 AM
  #32  
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Radical Hope by Jonathon Lear.

It sort of straddles philosophy and history by going into the story of Plenty Coups, a Crow nation chief dealing with the complete loss of his culture and all of its meaning. Anything meaningful and signficant like hunting buffalo, counting coup, and all that ceased to have any meaning at all. Plenty Coups went on to forge a new path for himself and his people. The book gets into philosophical questions about meaning when everything that provided meaning and purpose completely disappears.

Also delving into Black Elk: Colonialism and Lakota Catholicism by Damian Costello. Black Elk is very significant in Lakota and Native American history and was a visionary medicine man. Many don't take his conversion seriously or thought it was a rejection of his heritage, but this book looks at his religious faith as a real extension of his Lakota heritage, that it wasn't a rejection, and in fact, built on his Lakota experience and culture. Black Elk fully embraced Christianity and gave it a truly Lakota expression, and used it to critique the treatment of his people as a violation of Christian faith.
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Old 02-23-2022, 08:23 AM
  #33  
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Started Caliban's War the second book in the Expanse series. I haven't watched the Amazon series yet. I'm the type that would rather read the book before watching the TV show/movie.

Next up is planned to be Lonesome Dove. Sci-fi to western my tastes are all over the place
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Old 03-01-2022, 04:43 PM
  #34  
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i enjoyed reading fiction stores like the my name is memory. such a good book
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Old 03-04-2022, 04:09 AM
  #35  
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Hello, I am new
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Old 03-17-2022, 03:52 PM
  #36  
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The war of two Queens , Jennifer Armentrout
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Old 03-30-2022, 06:48 AM
  #37  
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I just finished Uncle Tom's Cabin. This is my first time to read the complete book. I've only read partial excerpts in the past. I just turned 55 years old yesterday and I can't believe I waited untlil now to read it. After it's printing in 1851, it was second only to the Bible in copies sold. . It is said that in 1862 Harriet Beecher Stowe met Abraham Lincoln, and Lincoln greeted her by saying "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war,” I couldn't help but wonder how many present day people have actually read it. The fact that "Uncle Tom" is now a derogatory term leads me to believe not many people have. Imo, the book may be the most important book written in the 19th century.

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Old 03-30-2022, 08:32 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by C. Davis View Post
I just finished Uncle Tom's Cabin. This is my first time to read the complete book. I've only read partial excerpts in the past. I just turned 55 years old yesterday and I can't believe I waited untlil now to read it. After it's printing in 1851, it was second only to the Bible in copies sold. . It is said that in 1862 Harriet Beecher Stowe met Abraham Lincoln, and Lincoln greeted her by saying "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war,Ē I couldn't help but wonder how many present day people have actually read it. The fact that "Uncle Tom" is now a derogatory term leads me to believe not many people have. Imo, the book may be the most important book written in the 19th century.

C. Davis
No probably not a lot have. I'll admit I haven't. If you're interested here is a NPR interview that explores how Uncle Tom became a derogatory term

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/...oryId=93059468

Last edited by lonestar50; 03-30-2022 at 08:34 AM.
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Old 03-31-2022, 01:04 PM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by lonestar50 View Post
No probably not a lot have. I'll admit I haven't. If you're interested here is a NPR interview that explores how Uncle Tom became a derogatory term

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/...oryId=93059468
It's really a shame. The book was banned in the South leading up to the Civil War, and it is banned in many places today for other reasons. I've read and seen that for every two people who read the book, five people watched the minstrel renditions that portray Tom as the old weak sell-out of his people. The true power of the book has been stolen.

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Old 03-31-2022, 04:12 PM
  #40  
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Happy birthday C. I have to admit, I never pick up a book myself until my neighbor gave me three books and said Read them in this order. They were ďThe perfect Storm, Isaacís Storm and Into Thin AirĒ. That got my reading kicked off. The authors really connected with me and I thought I was in the hurricane which hit Galveston Tx. And climbing Mt Everest. However, I traveled during my reading period. Itís hard to read not in a place with other distractions.

From my experience, I donít care for fiction. Thatís what Hollywood is for. I prefer nonfiction to understand what the experience was.

Some books on the top of my favorites,

Dead Wake - the Lusitania what school taught me was fiction.

The Devil In The White White City - Our biggest mass murder but they never knew how many victims. The great grandson (I think thatís the correct position) believes he was Jack The Ripper. Disturbing book for anyone with teenage daughters.

Custerís Last Stand. Philbrick was given unlimited access to the battleground.

Thunderstruck- One of my favorites because Iím an engineer geek. Itís a murder that occurred right at the same era Marconi invented the radio. I just bought that book for my son. Itís a must read.

last one, great read from one of our greatest economists Thomas Sollew. Black Rednecks and White Liberals.
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