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What do you smoke?

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What do you smoke?

Old 02-12-2020, 05:24 AM
  #11  
Dominant Buck
 
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Bacon, bacon

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Old 02-13-2020, 04:32 AM
  #12  
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Anything I can fit into this.
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Old 02-13-2020, 08:50 AM
  #13  
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Originally Posted by archeryrob View Post
Anything I can fit into this.
nice smokehouse. Your side firebox, do you find it difficult to load due to being so low? I'm also considering insulating mine by add a layer of cedar on the inside. I also have found my temps from left to right inside varied by as much as 20 degrees. So I first added a piece of steel on my base blocks to force the heat to disperse. I've replaced it with two piece of sheet metal which will allow me to control the heat on the inside. I haven't tried it with that setup but will with my next batch of bacon.
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Old 02-13-2020, 09:56 AM
  #14  
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In my youth...our family lived in a former old smokehouse, which was located on an abandoned plantation, called "Bluebell Hill Plantation". A second floor was added...but the first floor stone walls were 24" thick. It kept us cool in the summer and warm in the winter.

It also had a slave graveyard on the property.
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Old 02-13-2020, 08:01 PM
  #15  
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Wild Turkey Boobies
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Old 02-16-2020, 12:43 PM
  #16  
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Originally Posted by Fieldmouse View Post
nice smokehouse. Your side firebox, do you find it difficult to load due to being so low? I'm also considering insulating mine by add a layer of cedar on the inside. I also have found my temps from left to right inside varied by as much as 20 degrees. So I first added a piece of steel on my base blocks to force the heat to disperse. I've replaced it with two piece of sheet metal which will allow me to control the heat on the inside. I haven't tried it with that setup but will with my next batch of bacon.
I find the heat difference from the top to the bottom. 20 degrees when hot and stuff down the bottom cooks quicker.

I sit on the concrete in front of the firebox and load it. I plan to rebuild it to be tow vualted ovens on top of each other. Bottom one to use for the smokehouse and top one to be an oven and chimney for the smokeuse.
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Old 02-17-2020, 01:57 PM
  #17  
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I smoked cigarettes for 25 years and smoked heavily for at least half that time -- 2 packs per day. I quit in 1996 and have not smoked cigarettes since. I have smoked 3 or 4 or 5 cigars, but they never really caught my interest. Ultimately I just decided I didn't need to develop a new vice.

Cancer does seem to be something that is genetically conditioned. I worked for a South Korean man who was my boss at Samsung. He never smoked but was probably around others who smoked (South Koreans are big smokers). He died of lung cancer about the age of 45. Second hand smoke? Exposure to radon gas? Genetics? I don't know. I find it hard to believe the second hand smoke idea. How can the exposure resulting from second hand smoke be even close to the exposure the "first hand" smoker receives? Still, smoking is highly correlated to cancer.

In January 2018 I noticed a drop of blood in my urine. Just a drop. I noticed this again about 2 weeks later. Just a drop. I decided to see my personal physician. I am on blood thinner. My doctor hypothesized this was from having too much blood thinner, and he advised me to mention this to my cardiologist when I saw him next. Well, while I have my blood thickness checked monthly at my cardiologist, I only see the cardiologist about once per year. In this case my appointment with the cardiologist was only a few weeks later. He told me it could be simply related to my blood thinner . . . but it could be something else, too. He urged me to see a urologist. The urologist imaged the inside of my bladder -- a procedure called a cystoscopy -- and found a very small, 1st stage cancer. He excised this in an orthoscopic procedure a couple weeks later. I had this rechecked quarterly for a year. Now I have it checked every 6 months. Soon it will be just once per year. The cancer has not recurred. This was caught SUPER early. I may well never have any further problem with my bladder.

My urologist asked if I had ever smoked -- the same day he imaged the bladder cancer. Yes, 25 years. "You might ask 'why would you ask if I smoked after finding a cancer in my bladder?' Well, those carcinogens have to go somewhere. Mostly they go through the liver, to the kidneys, and then in to the bladder. Voila your bladder cancer."

Again, I am lucky. I've never had any symptoms of lung cancer. I may have no more issues with bladder cancer. But notwithstanding, smoking cigarettes is no kidding causing long term damage to your body. Quit now. It is easier than you might think. If you are early in your cigarette smoking habit, it is much easier than when you have established it for a longer period of time. Quit. There is no better advice you can receive.

If you have established a habit, there are some things you can do to help you quit and stay quit. Live healthy. Eat right. Drink plenty of water. Get enough sleep. Avoid drinking. Get exercise. Being rested, healthy, and strong will provide you with more reserves of will power to quit. Avoid activities you associate with smoking -- drinking alcohol for many people is such a situation. Maybe drink less. Maybe don't drink in a barroom. Maybe drink something different. You may want to avoid spending time with people who smoke. It may be easier to quit smoking now because it is positively difficult to find a place to smoke now. Restaurants don't let you smoke. You can't smoke in the workplace. I used to smoke at my desk at work, back in 1985 or thereabouts. When I quit smoking, I used to have to walk about 400 feet from my desk and go outside the office building to smoke. In the winter I would walk around the corner of the building to be out of the wind. It just is too much hassle. Quit.
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