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In what age did you learn to read?

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In what age did you learn to read?

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Old 03-08-2018, 12:33 PM
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Spike
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Default In what age did you learn to read?

And was it harder with your children? I'm curious to compare because I hear so often that modern children are such a big problem in this case.
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Old 03-08-2018, 12:47 PM
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I was reading when I was 4, my mother taught me. I started first grade when I was 5 and they put me on a 3rd grader reading book because the 1st grade one was too easy for me. I still love to read.
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Old 03-08-2018, 08:19 PM
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I started out slow, I was dyslexic. Back then they had little to no idea what dyslexia was.
My Mom found a special school. A couple of hours a day after school for a few months and everything was fine.
I remember the school and Mrs. Lamb well. She used a technique I've never heard of since. Different colored lenses/glasses, flash cards and writing. I think she had a technique to rewire your brain a little.
I'm still 60/40 ambidextrous, I can drive nail with either hand and pistol shoot almost as well lefty as righty.

All of my kids are multi lingual, read and write in at least two languages. All of them way better than I am at it, I'm fluent in two, passable in another, but it came hard, not easy.

I noticed with one of my granddaughters, we message often, her go to is emojis. She uses many acronyms or a kind of shorthand. I think she had a phone as soon as she could walk. Her speed and skills are well beyond mine. One thing that surprises me, is she seems to spell well. Maybe it is the auto correct on her laptop or phone?
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Old 03-09-2018, 03:18 PM
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who knows?

I'd assume kids are reading sooner than ever with all these smart phones etc...

I wish I knew I actually enjoyed reading non-fiction vs. hating reading altogether sooner than college.

I can't stand fiction, but non-fiction, love it.
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Old 03-09-2018, 10:23 PM
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I learned to read in a golden age, the 60's. Sal makes a good point with kids using smart phones. I honestly hadn't thought about that.
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Old 03-10-2018, 03:06 AM
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I guess you might say they are reading earlier if you count U and C and emogies as being words. They cannot however write, they are no longer teaching cursive writing in our schools and they are not taught to tell time on a clock with hands. My daughter had to teach my grand kids how to tell time on a conventional clock because they had digital clocks at school. Education today is not what it was in the 60s because of smart phones and computers.
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Old 03-10-2018, 04:34 AM
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My mother says I was reading and writing at age three. Our daughters were the same. Grandma has been teaching them Japanese also. They write in cursive and they can also write all the hiragana. She is trying to teach them the kanji at the same pace as if they were in a Japanese school. They have to know about 3,000 kanji by the time they get to high school. (Samples of hiragana and kanji in my sig.)



Sheep don't have to know how to read
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Old 03-10-2018, 07:40 AM
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My grandmother got me started on reading about 4 and writing about 5. As a kid I loved books.
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Old 03-10-2018, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Oldtimr View Post
I guess you might say they are reading earlier if you count U and C and emogies as being words. They cannot however write, they are no longer teaching cursive writing in our schools and they are not taught to tell time on a clock with hands. My daughter had to teach my grand kids how to tell time on a conventional clock because they had digital clocks at school. Education today is not what it was in the 60s because of smart phones and computers.
I can't say if cursive is tought his year in the local schools but I know it was taught within the last 5 years in local elementary school (K-5). The school even taught them how to tell time using an analog clock. I had to hunt through my house to find one but did and used it to help reinforce the school lessons.

As for whether education today is better or worse than the 60's, I'm kind of on the fence about that. I'd also be curious to get flags' opinion since he's still teaching in a HS.

My High Schoolers are learning Financial analysis in a class that uses Dave Ramsey's materials and are honestly a lot further ahead on personal economics than I was at their age. They were surprised when I told them that Dave Ramsey is on the radio every day but High Schoolers don't tend to search a lot on the AM radio band.

In one of the Government classes, they take issues and Supreme Court cases and have to present oral arguments just like a lawyer would in front of the Supreme Court. I even spoke with that Government teacher a couple days ago about the process and was frankly impressed at the process.

When I think back on my K-12 education (60's-70's), I remember advanced classes in 5th grade where the teacher had absolutely no clue about how to teach such a class other than assign more homework and do times tables 50 times instead of 5, etc. I remember Government classes being bit more utilitarian and did not have presentations on cases to a mock SC. I also wish like heck that we had a Financial Analysis class that used Dave Ramsey materials back then as that could have saved me money and a chunk of steep learning curve.

I'm not saying we received a bad education. We actually received a good education back then. It just covered different stuff and didn't cover some of what they learn today.
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Old 03-10-2018, 05:06 PM
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About 35 give or take. It wasn't until my neighbor gave me three books out of the blue and said, read these in this order. The Perfect Storm, Thee hungry Ocean and Into Thin Air. Since then, I've had an appetite for reading.

On a side note that dad needs to brag about. My son was 3.5 when he learned to ride a bike. Never got to the training wheels. Just decided it was happening. He pissed his older sister off so much she learned that day at age six. We still laugh about that competition today.

Last edited by Fieldmouse; 03-10-2018 at 05:08 PM.
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