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worstcaster 07-05-2015 04:14 PM

Cub scouts
 
Trying to plan cub scout projects for next fall. Want are some fun projects your kids enjoyed?

Topgun 3006 07-05-2015 04:24 PM

Making plaster casts of various animal tracks and identifying the animals that made them is usually fun for kids that age.

AF Hunter 07-05-2015 05:26 PM

Making a sun dial, id different leaves by their shapes (I'll never forget my pack leader taught us how to differentiate between red oaks and white oaks: Think of cowboys and Indians. Red oaks have pointed leaves like arrowheads and white oaks have rounded points on leaves like bullets which is probably no PC today. Like previously said, plaster animal prints. Find saplings to make walking sticks out of and then decorate them with feathers, painted on symbols of scouting, etc.

mr4pt 07-05-2015 05:34 PM

Primitive fire starting or flag history

dustyr 07-06-2015 02:39 AM

When I "mentored" a den many years ago, we used the recycle theme with most of our projects. Be surprised at how many things you can do with a 2 liter soda bottle. Put one of those things in front of them and let each member come up with an idea. Another thing we did, over the course of several meetings, was put together a mini survival kit.

flags 07-06-2015 05:06 AM

Teach them how to use a compass and a map. Show them the old ways still work and are good skills to know.

AF Hunter 07-06-2015 06:21 AM

Show them how to determine directions (north, south, east and west) by using a stick and the sunshine. Since you said cub scouts, I would avoid teaching the fire starting.

sachiko 07-06-2015 06:48 AM


Originally Posted by AF Hunter (Post 4205493)
Show them how to determine directions (north, south, east and west) by using a stick and the sunshine. Since you said cub scouts, I would avoid teaching the fire starting.

When I took Hunter Safety we were taught how to use a compass. We had one of those where the sighting thing flips up with a thread to allow you to sight on a target. You then go to the target and take a new sighting. Cool stuff. Useful in Michigan where the trees often make a GPS useless.

My husband has never owned a GPS, just uses a compass as needed.

Topgun 3006 07-06-2015 07:19 AM


Originally Posted by sachiko (Post 4205501)
When I took Hunter Safety we were taught how to use a compass. We had one of those where the sighting thing flips up with a thread to allow you to sight on a target. You then go to the target and take a new sighting. Cool stuff. Useful in Michigan where the trees often make a GPS useless.

My husband has never owned a GPS, just uses a compass as needed.

That's called "taking an azimuth" Sachiko. For many years I have carried the compass my Dad used in WWII that has as you put it "the sighting thing that flips up with a thread"! I carry a Garmin GPS because you can get within a few feet of a coordinate you're looking for, but I'd never be without that compass since any new fangled gadget can go bonkers at any time and it doesn't need batteries!

sachiko 07-06-2015 08:02 AM


Originally Posted by Topgun 3006 (Post 4205503)
That's called "taking an azimuth" Sachiko. For many years I have carried the compass my Dad used in WWII that has as you put it "the sighting thing that flips up with a thread"! I carry a Garmin GPS because you can get within a few feet of a coordinate you're looking for, but I'd never be without that compass since any new fangled gadget can go bonkers at any time and it doesn't need batteries!

My husband learned how to use it in basic training. I thought it was really cool. Using that with a map can get you where you want to go or back to where you started.


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