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Tires for rocky trails

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Tires for rocky trails

Old 01-18-2014, 04:21 PM
  #1  
Giant Nontypical
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Default Tires for rocky trails

Im at the end of getting my settlement from geico for my car wreck. Getting my offer monday

Theirs a 72 blazer down the road iv had my eye on after talking to the owner and finding out he replaced the motor leafsprings and done a bunch of work to it. Imma buy it do a light restore on it and make it my hunting fishin country cruisin toy. I love offroading and country cruising and being im in colorado im alittle worried bout tires on rocky trails

So anyone with experience on rock trails got a good tire recommendation. Im thinking the goodyear mtrs with kevler. This will see highways in the mountains maybe a trip to denver or two. So i dont want like a mud tire that beats the heck out of me and last 20k miles. When i had the mtrs on my jeep they had 30000 miles and still over 50-70% thread
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Old 01-20-2014, 07:01 AM
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I would suggest the Goodyear Amored as well. I have them on my truck and they ride really well and hold up excellent. They are pretty expensive but they last a long time.
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Old 01-20-2014, 09:49 AM
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Jeff how do they handle in the snow n mud. When i bought the mtrs i looked at em but wanted a more aggresive off road tire not sure i need that here but never know. Basically its gonna be my snow ride and occasianlly hunting fishing maybe little offroading. No moreud pits. The mud ate my bearings ujoints and such up in my jeep. Had alot of fun but changing ujoint every other month got old. I did get my use out of auto zones life time warrenty lol
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Old 01-20-2014, 01:00 PM
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BF Goodrich All Terrains. Kevlar sidewalls, not too loud driving down the street and great in mud and snow.
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Old 01-21-2014, 10:30 AM
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I never had to use mine in the snow but they have done pretty good in the mud especially with the tread pattern they have. I have used the Goodrich AT in the past and they have been excellent tires as well.
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Old 01-21-2014, 03:06 PM
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I like my Laramie Trailcutters.. They are 10 ply and can be pricey. But, they work great in the snow and mud. The are also nice on the highway as they are semi aggressive which gives you about the best of both worlds.. I travel the dirt roads alot up here when fishing and hunting. I have also traveled with a full load of hardwood fire wood which is s little over a cord of wood on my truck.. But whatever brand you get you may just look for the semi aggressive tires if you want both worlds.. Naturally we are almost certain to have the snow to travel threw up here.. If you are using a pick up truck make sure to put a little wieght on back when traveling in snow..

Last edited by Phil from Maine; 01-21-2014 at 03:10 PM.
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Old 01-21-2014, 04:25 PM
  #7  
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Originally Posted by Phil from Maine View Post
I like my Laramie Trailcutters.. They are 10 ply and can be pricey. But, they work great in the snow and mud. The are also nice on the highway as they are semi aggressive which gives you about the best of both worlds.. I travel the dirt roads alot up here when fishing and hunting. I have also traveled with a full load of hardwood fire wood which is s little over a cord of wood on my truck.. But whatever brand you get you may just look for the semi aggressive tires if you want both worlds.. Naturally we are almost certain to have the snow to travel threw up here.. If you are using a pick up truck make sure to put a little wieght on back when traveling in snow..
Unless you have racks on you can't get a full cord on an 8' pickup bed
RR
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Old 01-21-2014, 06:24 PM
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I happen to own a 1 ton with an 8 foot 2 inch bed along with a half rack up front on it. Yes a cord of hardwood is 4 wide 8 feet long and 4 feet high.. It also has no problem hauling a cord of wood. The most weight has been a little over 3 tons of junk metal in the body. By the way it also has 3 extra leaf springs on each wheel.. It can get any job done I want it to..
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Old 01-21-2014, 10:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Ridge Runner View Post
Unless you have racks on you can't get a full cord on an 8' pickup bed
RR
really............
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Old 01-22-2014, 03:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Tundra10 View Post
really............
Really, measure it, 128 cubic feet to the cord, to get a cord on a factory box bed the truck has to have racks just under 20" tall stacked up even to the top of the racks, I cut and deliver 40-50 cord of wood each season, my 3500 has a flat bed 7 x 9' the sides are 40" tall and holds 1.5 cords
RR

Last edited by Ridge Runner; 01-22-2014 at 03:11 AM.
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