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life after highschool? a little help

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life after highschool? a little help

Old 09-10-2013, 01:53 PM
  #21  
Dominant Buck
 
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The only advice I can offer is to follow your interests and do a job you like.
And do every job you have well! I have a few stories and one I'm currently in. In the end, you always must maintain your honor and integrity.
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Old 09-12-2013, 12:50 AM
  #22  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Originally Posted by timbercruiser View Post
Join the military. Sounds like you need to grow up some and they will train you for a career.
Dude, have you been rolling in sawdust sniffing pine sap again?
Let's see if I can make it sound nicer....
Join the military. They will give you a test to see what you are good at and then they will train you in that field.
....Howw did that sound? better?
If you are 18 you can spend 20-25 years making as much as 25% of college graduates, without having to repay student loans. That alone will mean you have more money than most of those college grads.
If you are 18 and you spend 25 years in the military you can retire at 43 years old at half pay, AND get a job like the rest of us and work until you reach social security age and then really retire.
You will have a very nice retirement account and will have earned in your lifetime more than the average college graduate!

P.S. while you are in the military you can go to college and they will pay for around half of the tuition if you sign up for the G.I. bill. With a degree you could become a commissioned officer and earn even more!
You wanna know what is so great about being an officer? Women just LOVE those shiny things on the collars and will do anything for you know matter how freaky you want her to be!

Whatever you do....STAY AWAY from EVEREST UNIVERSITY!!!!no I didn't go there....we have hired a bunch of them and not one of them knew anything about what they went to school for.
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Old 09-14-2013, 04:58 AM
  #23  
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I'm going to throw in my two cents worth here. Keep in mind that I'm likely younger than everyone else here.

I can understand that you aren't interested in the military. The military is for people who want to go out and fight the enemy, whoever it might be, wherever they might be. Of course you can get job training and college opportunities too, but you can get that in other ways. The military may decide you are a perfect fit for some particular job you absolutely hate. Problem, you can't quit and go elsewhere.

Someone once said that the way to be truly happy in life is to find something you really love doing and figure out a way to make a living at it. Of course, this may require a great deal of work and dedication.

Can you make a living fishing or hunting? Some guys do. You can see them on TV I hear.

Can you make a living playing guitar? Sure, some guys do. We've met some of the guys who play in the bands that perform at the bar where we hang out. Well no, they don't make a living at it exactly, but the day job pays for the home and groceries and they enjoy practicing and playing with the band. Some of the guys actually make a living teaching their instrument as well as playing.

Those NASCAR guys make a living just driving a car around a semi-circular track and seem to really like it.

We know a couple of guys who make a living building and remodeling houses. They love it.

I love what I do. My husband loves what he does.

just be prepared to work hard learning how to do something.




Even shepherds lead a good life outdoors and they get to have a dog as a partner
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Old 09-14-2013, 09:15 AM
  #24  
LBR
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The military is for people who want to go out and fight the enemy,...
At best, very misleading. There are gobs of non-combatant MOS (jobs) in the military. Military bases are like cities within themselves, and they need pretty much every type worker a city needs--from clergy to cooks to IT to medical to office techs (secretaries), plus lots more.

The military may decide you are a perfect fit for some particular job you absolutely hate. Problem, you can't quit and go elsewhere.
Misleading and incorrect. You must have a certain score on your ASVAB to qualify for certain jobs, and on some you must pass a security clearance, and the military must have an opening for that job. For some, you must meet certain physical requirements, i.e. if you won't fit in a cockpit you can't be a fighter pilot.

When you sign up, you commit to doing a particular job for the duration of that contract--generally 2-6 years. After that, if you decide to re-enlist, you may have the option of choosing a totally different MOS. Some even go in as enlisted, then get the chance to attend OCS and become an officer.

There's more to it, but that's the short version. FWIW, I did serve in the military--U.S. Army. Due to the scores on my ASVAB, and my security clearance, I had countless jobs to choose from. The recruiter looked at my paperwork and asked "well, what would you like to do?". Regret I didn't know that I would have had to many options--I could have researched it better and made a better choice.

If you do decide to join the military, do your homework. Don't rely on opinion and heresay.
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Old 09-15-2013, 12:21 PM
  #25  
Dominant Buck
 
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When you sign up, you commit to doing a particular job for the duration of that contract--generally 2-6 years. After that, if you decide to re-enlist, you may have the option of choosing a totally different MOS. Some even go in as enlisted, then get the chance to attend OCS and become an officer.
and if you go airdale in the navy, better plan on not making it into your desired field/ job until your second enlistment. Your first tour is A school, squadron support, ships support, aircraft support. Only after about 6 years will you ever get into your actual career.

I bypassed aircraft support only because in my off hours I put in extra time working in the shop I want to end up in. When it came time to replace the put going guy, the military always likes doing things last minute and there was only one guy ready to step in on day one and do the job.
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Old 09-15-2013, 05:28 PM
  #26  
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College isn't for everybody. But get some kind of advanced training. Working in the drilling world is hard dangerous work. Be extremely careful about the Military if you choose that route. It will eat you up and spit you out when they don't want you anymore. Guard, Reserves or Active you probably will deploy. Do what makes you happy.
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Old 09-15-2013, 07:52 PM
  #27  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Originally Posted by Champlain Islander View Post
The only advice I can offer is to follow your interests and do a job you like. Having a college degree opens many more doors especially if you are unsure of the field you are looking at. The military is a wonderful place to learn and experience things especially if a person is off to a rough start, needs discipline and school isn't a high priority.
Exactly, I worked in the banking industry for 20+ years and had to get my degree to move further. Once I started school the company closed but decided to stick to school. Now I am interviewing for positions and they ask for transcripts not only to see if I am taking the necessary classes but also getting the grades. Without the classes I wouldn't get a second look.
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Old 09-16-2013, 07:07 AM
  #28  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Wow, lots of good advice here. If any of us could do it all over again...

I was fortunate during high school to have had a few different jobs - some that I really loved but would never have been able to have made a living at, and others that I absolutely hated but that there was a viable future for me in.

So, I looked at tech schools first (particularly Airframe and Powerplant, since that was my interest at the time), but agreed to try a university for a year. I bombed out of hard engineering quickly, but found my interests elsewhere and graduated with a degree in a broad field which I was able to use for 24 years in the military as well as every day afterward.

I taught ROTC on campus, and led Soldiers in combat. Here's what I'll tell you about the military of today. If you're interested in it for the benefits (college, pay, learning a "skill", etc.), you're likely to be disappointed. The military is, at its core, about service - to the country and to your comrades. Your wants and desires are secondary.

You're in a position many of us should envy you for - you have your whole life ahead of you. Consider what Alsatian said about not being completely wired yet. It's not a bad thing. Having some time to explore your interests and abilities is good. Consider also what's been said about the trades. Many of those are going to pay you well right out of school, but you're going to work around-the-clock in some cases, and when the weather outside is miserable, you're out there in it because other people are depending on you. Hard work is great when you're young, but you'll be wise to prepare yourself for a fallback plan for when you're older. That boring computer job will look more attractive when you've been frostbitten a few times or when you'd like to be able to coach your kid's baseball team but find yourself "on-call" all the time.

As well, avoid the temptation (learn from those of us who've made the mistakes) of getting your "toys" out ahead of your income. You know, boats, ATVs, jacked-up trucks, hot cars, fast motorcycles, ... Live within your means. A truck payment is fine, but don't take on so much debt otherwise that you'll never be able to afford to change careers if it's something you hate doing, because you're likely to be changing a couple of times before you're 30 years old.

Some of us are fortunate to be able to think now that our parents are a lot smarter than we gave them credit for being when we were teenagers. Grab onto an adult who won't blow smoke up your behind and instead give you honest and constructive advice - particularly when you're messing up (we all did it too, most of us learned from it). Listen to them, particularly when they're telling you to do something other than what your not-yet-wired decision making process is telling you what to do.

Yup, you have your whole life ahead of you - and what a GREAT thing that is!
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Old 09-16-2013, 07:55 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Fieldmouse View Post
and if you go airdale in the navy, better plan on not making it into your desired field/ job until your second enlistment. Your first tour is A school, squadron support, ships support, aircraft support. Only after about 6 years will you ever get into your actual career.

I bypassed aircraft support only because in my off hours I put in extra time working in the shop I want to end up in. When it came time to replace the put going guy, the military always likes doing things last minute and there was only one guy ready to step in on day one and do the job.
Would have to say not completely accurate.

Aviation Rating - go to school will determine whether you go I-Level or O-Level. After school if you get orders to C School you go to that. After that your either in a squadron if O-Level or Repair facility if I-Level. I was in my squadron a week before my first year anniversary.

Military is not for everyone. If you join dont go in with the predetermined idea that you are doing this for school. The military and your commands needs will come first. After spending the last 3 years of my enlistment working 14-16hr hour nights on a flight line. Not only was no school open at the time I got off but i had no energy left. I also wasnt one of the people who joined for the education it just so happened to be what was offered. So i was never disappointed in that regard.
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Old 09-16-2013, 03:40 PM
  #30  
Dominant Buck
 
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Aviation Rating - go to school will determine whether you go I-Level or O-Level. After school if you get orders to C School you go to that. After that your either in a squadron if O-Level or Repair facility if I-Level. I was in my squadron a week before my first year anniversary.
It may have changed but back in the day, you went to A school. Then to the fleet. In the fleet you were assigned to the squadron. When you make the squadron, you are assigned 90 days basically being the janitor of the hanger. After that, you go to the janitor ofthe aircraft. When you go on deployment, you are assigned 90 days to ships company aka janitor of the ship. Both janitor positions of the hangar and ships company are stated 90 days but only get finished when another body can take your place. I did 100 days and 120 days in them. After that, you go back to being janitor of the aircraft. Moving them, washing them inside and out. You didnt leave that shop until all those ahead of you move on. That occurred in your second tour of duty.
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