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Cutting Up Deer Accidents

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Cutting Up Deer Accidents

Old 11-15-2012, 08:22 PM
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Default Cutting Up Deer Accidents

This is 100% user error. I am posting the little predicament I found myself in today so everyone can be aware of how easy things can go wrong.

I have been on vacation all this week. I've had the 500 acres all to myself. The weather has been beautiful. The last 3 mornings have started out in the mid 30's with no wind. The moon phase is perfect.

Tues. morning, I took out a spike. This morning (Thurs.) I was looking to fill one of my two doe tags, and at least have a freezer full, before I can hunt for a good buck. At about 9:20 this morning this one came out, and I just happen to be awake. The woods are so peaceful, and I am on vacation.

Here she is gutted, loaded, and ready to take to camp:


I get back to camp with her, and have her skinned in pretty short order. I start taking her apart starting with the shoulders. Those come right off just barely touching them with knife. Here, my normal routine is to next remove the hind quarters, then the tenderloins, then the back straps, but for some reason I decide to go for the tender loins. As I'm reaching in to retrieve those little jewels, the deer of course is spinning, and with my mind still on the election I guess, I slide my surgically sharp knife right across the top of my hand. Had it not scraped the bare bone, I may have never even felt it.

Now, I am leaving my own blood trail to the seat of my truck where I thought I had an extra towel, but it is not there. I strip down to my tee-shirt, and get it off. That is my pressure rag.

So here I am, about 6 miles away from the house, all by myself at camp, with a deer partially quartered, with a cut I don't quite know how bad yet, but I know it is to the bone. And, I have given no thought to carry a first aid kit. (lesson learned)

I take the shirt off of my hand, and I am relieved to see there is no gushing of blood, just a good ooze when I make a fist. And sure enough, there is my white knuckle bone. So what do I do? Do I call for Help? Do I drive off leaving the deer hanging? Who do I call? Only a few people know how to get to me.

I decide, after some time had passed with the pressure applied that I could just wrap my hand good and tight with the tee-shirt I have now cut in half, and finish the deer. Here is my cut after the bleeding has quit some:



With my wrapped hand, I manage to get the deer finished. I don't call my wife until now, because I know she would freak out, and demand I leave the deer, and everything, and get home. I call and tell her the situation, and for her to go buy some ice before I get there to put on the meat. I tell her to call the doc's office, because I will definitively need to be sewed up. Thank God we did not have to spend the day in the ER. The doc sewed it up in no time, and we had time left over to eat out.

It could have been a lot worse. Six stitches later my hand looks like a baseball. Here is the knife, and my new scar:



Things can happen out of nowhere.
Be Careful.

C. Davis

Last edited by C. Davis; 11-15-2012 at 09:52 PM.
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Old 11-15-2012, 09:00 PM
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Don't feel to bad about it, I've done dumber things. Not so sure it was an accident though. Thinking too much about those election results could make any man commit a spontaneous subconcious suicide attempt! I'd say you should be commended for only slightly injuring yourself!
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Old 11-15-2012, 09:19 PM
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Originally Posted by ruffryder1221 View Post
Don't feel to bad about it, I've done dumber things. Not so sure it was an accident though. Thinking too much about those election results could make any man commit a spontaneous subconcious suicide attempt! I'd say you should be commended for only slightly injuring yourself!
Yep, that scar is minor compared to what is coming.

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Old 11-16-2012, 01:49 AM
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Nice knife. I guess you were actually lucky you didn't get some tendons or an artery.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:40 AM
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Unfortunately I think anyone that has hunted for any amount of time has a similar scar. My dad would have called that a "bought lesson".

I got 6 stiches in my thumb many years ago removing a broadhead from a shaft--wanted to go shoot a few practice arrows, didn't have spare arrows with me, thought "I'll just swap these points out real quick". Didn't take the time to find a broadhead wrench...that one cost me. On a Sunday too--had to go to ER.

I have to ask--what kind of sharpening system do you use? I can get a knife fairly sharp--not like my dad could, but tolerable--you sound like you have your knife in the same range as my dad could get them. He only used one simple stone (the man had skills). I've never been able to duplicate it.
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Old 11-16-2012, 05:42 AM
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on saturday we were cutting up a buck i shot i went to take the front legs off and my hand slipped i cut in to my wrist it was deep but we didnt think i needed stitches it will probably leave a scar though

Last edited by toejoe625; 11-16-2012 at 05:45 AM.
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:28 AM
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a lil superglue works miracles. they used it in war, and now even the doc's use it at the hospital. fill the wound, close the wound and hold fer a few seconds, and its good to go. yes, even as deep as that was. as long as ya didnt hit main arteries or tendons. (its not squirting blood 6 inches every time yer heart beats, and you can wiggle all yer fingers.) must have fer a 1st aid kit.
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Old 11-16-2012, 06:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Champlain Islander View Post
Nice knife. I guess you were actually lucky you didn't get some tendons or an artery.
Thanks, that was my very first concern. It bled a pretty good bit, but I knew I had not cut an artery and my finger still worked. Of course right there at first I was thinking the worst.

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Old 11-16-2012, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by LBR View Post
I have to ask--what kind of sharpening system do you use? I can get a knife fairly sharp--not like my dad could, but tolerable--you sound like you have your knife in the same range as my dad could get them. He only used one simple stone (the man had skills). I've never been able to duplicate it.
The secret, and hardest thing for me to get is the edge all the way to the tip. You know you have the edge when you can hold it under a light, and there are no light reflections coming off the edge you are working on.

Even though I have been able to do a few with a stone, I am probably more like you in that I need some help. I have had some pretty good luck with the Lansky system. I use it just to get the edge set. But, what I have learned is to scrub the stones in hot soapy water before you use them, and use a bunch of honing oil, because the microscopic steel shavings need to float and not clog the stone pores.

Once the edge is finally set. The rest is finesse. This is the rule I broke for years. I would use the same elbow grease with the fine stones as I was using with the course stones trying to get the edge. As it gets sharper, the edge itself gets more delicate.

And then, maybe most important is the steel itself. I have found that I can actually do a pretty good job on higher carbon content steel with just a wet stone. Carbon steel being the kind that tarnishes a dark color over time. For the life of me, I cannot not do well with stainless using just a stone.

I bought the knife in the picture from a knife maker by the name of Mike Stanley. He is a guy who sells his knives at the gun shows when they come by the area. He claims that his knives are "Knives that hold their edge." He says the secret is the steel that he uses. It is the best stainless that I have ever had. I have his card and could call him to ask him again what grade of stainless it is. I do know that it is not 440.
He claimed I could use it on several deer before I would even need to touch it. He gave me a ceramic stick and said if I ever needed, to lay the flat blade on the stick, raise the back of the blade, and the pull the knife across the stick just tickling the edge. He said if I ever needed the edge set again to send it to him and he would do it for free.

Yesterday's was deer number five with that knife. All I have done is just barely tickle it with the ceramic stick. That trick has helped with my other knives also.

C. Davis

Last edited by C. Davis; 11-16-2012 at 08:03 AM.
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Old 11-16-2012, 11:54 AM
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Thanks! I think my biggest problem is patience--I don't have nearly enough when it comes to sharpening.

I agee with HB--I've used superglue on several cuts (not as nasty as yours though) and it works great.
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