Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Regional Forums > Northeast
Deer Struggling In The Deep Snow >

Deer Struggling In The Deep Snow

Northeast ME, NH, VT, NY, CT, RI, MA, PA, DE, WV, MD, NJ Remember, the Regional forums are for hunting topics only.

Deer Struggling In The Deep Snow

Old 02-19-2010, 12:42 PM
  #21  
Banned
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location:
Posts: 2,978
Default

Deer most certainly are effected by severe conditions. Just ask Maine, who despite having relatively low deer densities still have winter loss regularly, and at times a significant portion of the herd.

Deer burn alot of calories just walking through that stuff, and staying just staying warm in very cold conditions.

Deer might be able to reach a very slight bit higher up , but remember, they dont walk on top of snow. The very small narrow shape of the feet and legs are not conducive to walking on snow like a snowshoe hare. They sink straight down into it.

There will most likely be losses. Perhaps not as severe as some states, but some fawns of the year wont fair well.
Cornelius08 is offline  
Old 02-19-2010, 01:40 PM
  #22  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Carbon County Pa.
Posts: 601
Default

Originally Posted by WillPA View Post
cardeer.
You unfortunately are probably right.

The PGC will blame their terrible mismanagement on the storm of Feb 2010. The huge SGL around Shartlesville PA 4C will not have a problem with mortality. There are only a handful of deer left in the 10 mile stretch that I walk weekly

I ride horseback up on that strech a couple times a year. I don't see very much deer sign either. They do have some really nice food plots on that mountain .
pats102862 is offline  
Old 02-19-2010, 04:44 PM
  #23  
Nontypical Buck
 
BuckAlley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Altmar New York USA
Posts: 1,247
Default

Originally Posted by Cornelius08 View Post
Deer most certainly are effected by severe conditions. Just ask Maine, who despite having relatively low deer densities still have winter loss regularly, and at times a significant portion of the herd.

Deer burn alot of calories just walking through that stuff, and staying just staying warm in very cold conditions.

Deer might be able to reach a very slight bit higher up , but remember, they dont walk on top of snow. The very small narrow shape of the feet and legs are not conducive to walking on snow like a snowshoe hare. They sink straight down into it.

There will most likely be losses. Perhaps not as severe as some states, but some fawns of the year wont fair well.

As I said long harsh winters. Thats what Maine has every winter. So yes obviously Maine has more winter mortality as do other harsh winter states. NY has had winters with significant deer mortality. Also I've never seen snow that remains light, and fluffy all winter long. It packs down. Ever notice a fresh snow of several inches, and next day its a few inches lower? Snow on top of snow compacts it. Deer don't drop all the way to the hard ground throughout winter. I've seen winter yards in spring that the height deer reached available browse is quite high.
BuckAlley is offline  
Old 02-20-2010, 11:51 AM
  #24  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 263
Default

i saw this same picture last year in the winter.
bigmster127 is offline  
Old 02-20-2010, 04:54 PM
  #25  
Fork Horn
 
WestVirginiaBrent's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 343
Default

I think that photo is an old Larue or Briggs photo, it's in one of my fathers old books.

I drove around today and saw quite a few deer and about 10-15 turkey all feeding while the feeding is good.
WestVirginiaBrent is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.