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Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

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Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Old 04-17-2009, 01:52 AM
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Default Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Trying to copy and paste an article in a new thread and having big time problems. Internet explorer not allowing it? Food for thought and shoots down the theory that it is impossible to overharvest deer, esp. in poorer habitat. Maybe someone can help me by pasting the whole article and not just the link.

http://www.deeranddeerhunting.com/article/Is_It_Possible_to_Kill_Too_Many_Does/
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Old 04-17-2009, 03:40 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Since it is a rather long article it might work better if we discuss specific topics covered in the article. In light of RSBs claims that the herd habitat is controlling the herd in 2G ,I found this quote particularly interesting.
Subsequent studies have confirmed such localized deer removal might drastically reduce deer numbers in highly fragmented habitat as occurs in residential areas. Likewise, investigators believe such a surgical approach might be feasible in the central Adirondacks.

Logically, unintentional overharvesting of white-tailed does might produce similar results and, due to social disruption, cause unfavorably low deer numbers in local areas for a relatively long time. Likewise, excessive natural deer mortality, for whatever reason, in any given area, could theoretically produce similar localized consequences.


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Old 04-17-2009, 04:06 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Progeny Quality
Surprisingly, although the herd was supplementally fed, buck fawns raised by social does exhibited superior growth rates as compared to those raised by isolate does. In March, when we livetrapped the herd, social buck fawns weighed, on average, 91.3 pounds compared to 84.4 pounds for isolate buck fawns. But we saw no such difference among social versus isolate doe fawns, which weighed 71.1 pounds and 71.7 pounds, respectively.

The most plausible explanation for the difference noted in the growth rate is that buck fawns experienced certain nutritional benefits related to family living, a situation scientists refer to as “social facilitation.”

Presumably, the compatible association demonstrated by members of a cohesive clan enable buck fawns to obtain more (or perhaps better quality) forage in grazing over a larger ancestral range. Because males also are more independently active than females, buck fawns more frequently accompanied close kin to feeders independent of the mother’s schedule. By comparison, males reared by isolate does were entirely dependent upon maternal guidance.
Here is an important factor to consider for those concerned of buck quality. Buck fawns obviously fare better when raised in a social group as opposed to a solitary doe, as is more likely in areas of low DD.
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Old 04-17-2009, 04:13 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Based on studies he conducted in South Texas, D&DH Southern Field Editor Bob Zaiglin warned, “There is the potential drawback of prematurely removing does that have fawns.”

According to Zaiglin, “Early orphaning can reduce a fawn’s home range. Although fawn movements were unaffected by orphaning, orphaned fawns occupied smaller home ranges (383 acres) than did unorphaned fawns (713 acres).More importantly, without a doe, the orphaned fawns could have experienced a disadvantage, particularly in search for food, water and, more critically, escape cover from predators.”

Probably as a result, in South Texas, orphaned doe fawns weighed an average of 9.1 pounds less than unorphaned doe fawns when killed about a year later. The orphans were also more likely to die from natural causes.
And here is a solid argument against having too early of an antlerless season as we do in October as part of HR disguised as an additional ML opportunity. Although it would also tend to go against harvesting does in early archery season as well, though the archery doe harvest is likely spread over the month and a half season, giving some opportunity for does to finish weaning and even run off the male fawns prior to her entering estrous in early to mid november, as opposed to the concentrated harvest during the ML and senior/ junior rifle seasons in Oct, giving nature a chance to run it's course, so to speak.
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Old 04-17-2009, 04:20 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

This story has the makings of a fairy tale except the happy ending.


Therefore, heavy harvesting of doe groups did not impair reproductive performance of the survivors. In fact,we saw improved productivity among isolate does in at least one age class (21/2-yearolds). As a result, population recovery would probably proceed faster than expected if not all members of kinship groups were removed.
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Old 04-17-2009, 04:37 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

You apparently inadvertently forgot to include the sentence that followed your quote..
Whether the same outcome would prevail for deer subjected to heavy predation, acute winter malnutrition and lengthy seasonal migration remains unknown.
So the fairy tale may not have a happy ending after all.
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Old 04-17-2009, 04:50 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Thats my point the story gives every thing and yet nothing. He said ,she said, blah blah.

Then throw in the bunny huggers point of view and I'm done. [:'(]
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Old 04-17-2009, 07:04 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

I dont think most need an article to show that deer can be overharvested. They needed re-stocked at the turn of the century!

By comparison, its not hard to figure the effects of 900,000+ hunters with modern weaponrywith obscene numbers of doe tags can do when encouraged to slaughter.
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Old 04-17-2009, 07:07 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

Hasn't RSB been claiming very high predation rates in 2F and 2G for a long time now? While marginal habitat can definitely be a contributing factor, so can a high level of HR resulting in low DD and specifically older matriarch does, asare specifically targeted for harvest within the guidelines in the PA hunting digest.



Clearly, the response of fawns to orphaning is highly variable, depending upon their sex, age and a host of environmental factors. Predator Defense Few failings are as unforgiving — or as abruptly terminal — as a deer’s failure to avoid a predator. Logically, then predation has been a strong selective force in the evolution of the whitetail’s behavioral traits — especially during the precarious fawning season and during harsh winter weather on Northern range.

The tendency for white-tailed does to form cohesive social groups of related individuals is probably an adaptation to exploit patches of ideal food and cover, and to maximize offspring survival. The close alignment of fawn-rearing territories, as occurs among related does, assures the harmonious use of available space and provides an effective defense against marauding predators.

Mature, maternally experienced does exhibit superior predator-avoidance skills and invariably rear a greater percentage of their offspring, as compared to younger ones. This is especially evident when faced with effective predators, such as the coyote, black bear and gray wolf — as I discussed in the December 2006 issue of Deer & Deer Hunting (see page 96).

Young does fawning for their first time tend to set up and defend fawning territories border-to-border with their mothers’ territories. As a result, the young inexperienced mother can reap certain benefits. Because a doe cannot distinguish the calls of her own fawns from those of strange fawns, it’s not unusual to see two or more does rush to defend a bawling fawn.

Such behavior likely proves especially beneficial to the inexperienced young mother and her offspring, as the matriarch sometimes inadvertently lends defense against predators.

On Northern range, associating with an older deer helps the young ones to learn lengthy migratory routes, to locate favorable wintering areas, and survive the threat from predators. Also, there is definite safety in numbers when deer are subjected to harsh winter conditions and potential threat from predators.Multiple deer also do a better job of maintaining packed trails, which are critical to the whitetail’s mobility and escape from predators.

Because older does are better able to protect their newborns from predators — and provide critical guidance for younger deer during harsh winter weather — this adaptive advantage is lost when the bulk of the mature does are removed from the population.
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Old 04-17-2009, 07:19 AM
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Default RE: Overharvesting of does- John Ozoga

One fact. Dead deer dont reproduce. Bucks breed mulitple does .Does Only conceive one time a year if lucky. Kill all the does and the bucks turn gay. Stop over harvesting and the deer will return. Then feed them cheapo State.
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