Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > General Hunting Forums > Hunting Gear Discussion
 Hardcore Backpack hunting gear? >

Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

Hunting Gear Discussion Clothing, stands, ATV's, optics, scents, calls, etc... read the latest reviews of hot new hunting gear items here.

Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

Old 03-22-2008, 09:53 PM
  #1  
Fork Horn
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location:
Posts: 166
Default Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

I am shifting into a more hardcore Backpack style of hunting for some of this year and am buying some of the gear soon. If Uncle Sam gives me some of my money back. If some of you more seasoned guy's could comment on my selection especially if you have used the Items yourself.

I have a Badlands 4500 pack

I need a:

Tent- I am leaning toward a MSR Mutha Hubba just in case Iever have friends that want to hunt serious.


Stove- MSR gets the nod again in the pocket rocket

Sleeping bag- I think I want the Cabelas Alaskan outfitter 0 deg model, I know there are some lighter ones out there but I think this is a good trade off

Sleeping pad- I havent found a solid candidate yet


Are there some things I am missing? I would much rather not find out the hard way as I usually hunt solo.

Enlighten me with your wisdom!

WhitetailsInc.info is offline  
Old 03-22-2008, 10:52 PM
  #2  
mez
Nontypical Buck
 
mez's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Sturgis, SD
Posts: 1,983
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

I would rethink the sleeping bag. 7.5lbs may not seem like much but you will regret it,not a good trade off. I made the same mistake on a trip to Wyoming and first thing I did when I got home was geta 3lb backpack model sleeping bag. Not only will the Alaskan bag be heavy but it is also bulky. Trust me, get a backpack model.
mez is offline  
Old 03-24-2008, 11:44 AM
  #3  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Colorado
Posts: 335
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

I have not done any backpack hunting but have backpacked some and agree w/ Mez on the sleeping bab. depending on the terrain, location and weather, you can save a lot of weight by ditching the tent and going with a bivy or just a tarp. A tent isn't that much warmerbut does offer some wind protection which you can also get around by chosing your camping spot more carefully. A tarp usually offers enought protection from moisture and can be usefull in many other ways. I would ditch the tent and put my money into a bivy or into a high end pad. I have not had good luck with the self inflating pads and they tend to be cold in winter (cold goes right through to the bag and your back side) but they now have them with down insulation in them and an insulation rating. I'm still wary of anything that has to inflate. I'd personally go with a closed cell foam pad. They are bulky but can be tied on the outside of the pack or put inside and wrapped around stuff. MSR stove are proven effective. You might want to look at the windpro though. It is marginally heavier but offers an advante in a windy environment and it is easier to get the canister off the cold ground or out of the snow. The fuel mix they use has improved but can still struggle at cold/altitude.

I suggest you google light weight backpacking. All the tips the backpackers will give you on saving weight and equipment reviews will apply and help you.

Spud
spuddog is offline  
Old 03-24-2008, 03:47 PM
  #4  
 
wyotimberghost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: WYO
Posts: 2,298
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

You definitely need to get a different bag. Because there is the possibility of getting nasty weather during hunting season, I'd go with a synthetic bag rather than a down bag because down will not insulate when wet. IMO the best synthetic bag material in Polarguard Delta. As far which model to purchase, it kind of depends on when and where you will be hunting. If you're going to be high up in the mountains during late fall, a 0 degree bag would be nice. But if you're going to be hunting early fall or at lower elevations, a 15 degree bag will be more than enough. I personally have the North Face Snowshoe (0 degree rating with Polarguard Delta $190) and an older Sierra Designs bag (was rated for 25 degrees but is higher now due to heavy use, filled with Polarguard 3D). I really love the North Face bag, and highly recommend it. If you want a 15-20 degree bag, the North Face Cat's Meow is an excellent bag. It's the same as the Snowshoe with less fill and no draft collar.

Regardless of which bag you buy, store it in a large storage bag or better yet, leave it hanging up on the wall.

For a sleeping pad, I don't care much for self-inflating pads either. I like the foam pads. I have the Therm-A-Rest Ridgerest right now that works well, but I think I'll upgrade to the Therm-A-Rest Z-Lite this summer. It packs up a little smaller.

The tent you're looking at looks nice. I have the Sierra Designs Omega 3S, which is only slightly lighter, and I think it is a fine weight for backpacking. The fly and footprint pitch option is very nice if you're looking to shave weight and save space.

The MSR pocket rocket would be a good stove, but I'm partial to Brunton products so if I were in your shoes I'd get the Brunton Raptor if I wanted that style of stove. I kind of like the more expensive stoves that run off of a variety of fuels simply because white gas is dirt cheap and you could siphon gasoline/diesel out of your truck in a pinch. But you should be fine so long as you are sure to bring enough butane canisters.

Other little gadgets that I have and like: Brunton windproof butane lighter, Brunton lightweight backpacking cookware, Primus titanium (superlight) eating utensils, Brunton compass, Primus LED headlamp.

I plan on purchasing a new water purifier this summer, which is something every backpacker should have. I drink straight out of streams once I get above timberline where I can see where the streams start and no moss is growing.

Also, if you plan on eating the lightweight freeze-dried food, be careful about which ones you choose. Some of them taste like crap. I lived off the stuff for a week in the Alaskan wilderness and some of the entres tasted horrible. It's not much fun humping straight up and down mountains all day then having to eat bad tasting food for dinner.

One last thought- don't just limit your backpacking to hunting season! It makes for a great weekend adventure during the summer, and it keeps you in good shape. Not to mention the dynamite fishing spots you can get to high up in the mountains.


wyotimberghost is offline  
Old 03-25-2008, 07:16 PM
  #5  
Fork Horn
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location:
Posts: 166
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

Thanks Guys,

All very good info. It seems the concensus is the bag is too heavy, I'm glad I asked.

I had previously considered a stove that ran on a number of fuels, My truck is a diesel so it is unlikely I would but other fuel for the stove and I didn't think Diesel was a good option at altitude or extreme cold.

I actually considered using the gear all summer as cheap weekend getaway not to mention getting used to the pack and conditioning .

Could the Tablets adequately eliminate the need for a water filter?

WhitetailsInc.info is offline  
Old 03-25-2008, 09:40 PM
  #6  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Colorado
Posts: 335
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

ORIGINAL: WhitetailsInc.info

Could the Tablets adequately eliminate the need for a water filter?
Yes they can as well you can get other various purifiers (straws, pens, etc) as well you can just boil water (but it tastes horrible) but the filters are light and you will appreciate the large volumes of water they can produce. This is one area I wouldn't shave. I'd definitely buy a light one though.

Spud
spuddog is offline  
Old 04-02-2008, 11:17 AM
  #7  
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location:
Posts: 211
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

Don't discount a blow-up air mattress with down inside the chambers. I have one, it's like sleeping on a water bed, I love it. I think I have a Big Agnes model. I slept at 8000' in Oct. when it got down in the single digits and I was toasty warm. I also pack a lightweight flannel sleeping bag for the bag in bag effect. I've used it when traveling too, easy to crash anywhere when your comfortable.
bugs11 is offline  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:40 PM
  #8  
Fork Horn
 
FarNorth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Eastern Oregon
Posts: 104
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

Pete,

I've been backpacking and backpack hunting for longer than I'd like to admit. Three words.....Ounces Make Pounds!

It's already been pointed out that your choice of sleeping bag is too heavy. You should be able to get a good bag in the 3 pound range, no problem. I don't really want to get into the down vs. synthetic debate, but I use nothing but down bags. They are a lot lighter and will outlast a synthetic bag about 10 to 1. Look at Thermarest sleeping pads.

There are lighter tents for you want to do too. The big question is how much do you want to spend? I'm sure you already know that top quality lightweight gear is spendy. My favorite tents are made by Hilleberg. You can google them and find their web site. Nothing stronger for the weight IMHO.

I think your choice of stoves is good, the pocket rocket is hard to beat. I agree about water treatment of some kind too. Boiling water uses way too much fuel. I started using a Steripen last year after numerous years of using filters. I'm sold. Only four ounces, and after using it for weeks in the bush last fall, I'm still alive to talk about it.

I do have to disagree with what was said about the Mountain House freeze dried food. I think most of their food is pretty good. Just supplement it with some snacks and you're good to go.

Hope this helps a little.

Ken
FarNorth is offline  
Old 04-02-2008, 01:18 PM
  #9  
Fork Horn
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location:
Posts: 166
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

I am already exceeding my spending limts on equip. To drop some weight on the tent (and expense) I'm goingwith a 2-person model, I'm tired of providing gear for others use anyway. I have been caught on the synthetic vs. Down thing. I know the odds of it getting damp are extremely high but I struggle to find a syn bag @3#'s I can afford. The jury is still out on the pad, I have read so many review's of that style pad leaking I can't ignore the risk. I think just a foam t-rest pad will do as insulation is more important to me than comfort. All replies so far have been very helpful.

Thanks
WhitetailsInc.info is offline  
Old 04-02-2008, 01:59 PM
  #10  
 
wyotimberghost's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: WYO
Posts: 2,298
Default RE: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?

If money is an issue, look for gear at the following websites. There's usually a pretty good chance of finding good deals.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/
http://www.rei.com/outlet/
http://www.campmor.com/
http://www.backcountryoutlet.com/
http://www.steepandcheap.com/

The last website only sells one thing at a time buy their deals are by far the best most of the time. You have to check it constantly to see what they're selling, and if you see something you want buy it as soon as you can because the good deals go fast.

As far as down vs. synthetic goes, I don't think there's a clear winner because they both have their fair share of pros and cons. You just have to decide which one will suit your needs best and still be whithin your price range. I wanted to get down when I bought my last bag, but a good down bag is a lot more expensive than a good synthetic bag.

Also, if weight is a concern and this will be your only bag, I suggest you look at a 15-25 degree bag instead of a 0 degree bag. It will be much more versatile, lighter, cheaper and it will compress into a smaller stuff sack. I typically only use my 0 degree bag from about Novermber-May/June, and my (approximately)30 degree bag gets used the rest of the year. I think most people underestimate how warm a 15-25 degree bag will keep them. I'd use one in 0 degree weather without hesitation if I had a good tent and pad. You just have to keep your clothes on and sinch the hood all of the way shut.
wyotimberghost is offline  

Quick Reply: Hardcore Backpack hunting gear?


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.