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Shooting Hogs During Their Security Checks

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Shooting Hogs During Their Security Checks

Old 10-02-2015, 04:59 AM
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Fork Horn
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Default Shooting Hogs During Their Security Checks

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7O_z...ature=youtu.be

I went out a couple of nights ago to do more product evaluation with a new spotting scope, but got to document something that I think is pretty neat. Not all hogs will give you this chance, but often times lone hogs come in to a feeder, clearing, or water hole area and will be on their guard, stopping every few feet to assess their security, sniffing the air, listening, etc., then proceeding and repeating a short distance later. Sometimes you will get sentinel hogs in sounders that will do the same thing even when all of the other hogs are scurrying around.

During these security checks is a great time to shoot the hog. First, the hog is usually quite stationary, though only for a few seconds. Second, they often present something good to shoot (high head or at least a nice broadside). Third, it is a patternable behavior. And fourth, I like the irony of beating them when they are most on guard.
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Old 10-02-2015, 02:03 PM
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Congratulations on your hog. Thanks for posting such great videos.
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Old 10-02-2015, 05:02 PM
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Thanks for your posts and videos.

Wild hogs are still adapting to threats.

There are "scout" pigs and "point" pigs". Many times over the past three years i have observed one sounder of about 40 hogs from a comfortable blind with shooting rests, heat and swivel chairs. The sounder comes into a mesquite patch 450 yards from the blind, then two "scouts" are dispatched. The sounder waits for the "scouts" to return. The "scouts" travel up a ravine to a wheatfield. Then they report back to the sounder. The sounder then moves off to the wheatfield. A couple times the sounder turned and left the area.

In one area i hunt many hogs are descendents of Eurasian boars: These sounders will stage a hundred yards or more from the food source or water. One may hear some low grunts as the sounder waits for dark. Sometimes they wait for an hour or more. Then there's some serious squealing as an immature pig, usually a boar, is appointed "point" pig. The "point" pig comes in fast, hackles raised, with the sounder trailing 50-100 yards behind. i've shot the "point" pig several times.

Sometimes sounders are accompanied by a large boar. The big boar may not eat. He may be stationed 15-30 yards from the sounder, observing.

In another area i hunt the sounders will not scatter when threatened. They bunch up tight and run.

Last evening i was in a blind overlooking a feeder. Heard a sounder about 150 yards away. They never came my way. The sounder went to another feeder 250 yards away; the one i intended to occupy before i changed my mind.
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:51 PM
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The large boar standing off to the side, "observing," is usually waiting to mate with a female.

I have seen scouts and "point" hogs, though I am not sure I would differentiate between the two, but I have seen the exact behaviors you described.

Bunch up tight and run?

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Old 10-03-2015, 06:02 AM
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Bunch up tight and run?
They don't scatter when fired upon. It's probably a response to being chased by dogs. i see it south of Walters, OK where hog doggers operate. The sounder bunches up tight, runs and refuses to be brought to bay.

A college classmate inherited a huge estate in Austria that hosts boar hunts. She says the boars there stage, wait and usually send out "point" pigs. i'll hunt on that estate next year.

i often hunt along the Red River where sounders of 60-80 hogs are common. Those big sounders are often accompanied by 2-4 large boars.

Last edited by falcon; 10-03-2015 at 06:40 AM.
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Old 10-03-2015, 07:55 AM
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Hogs are evolving and it is likely different sounders have different habits. Hybrid Hogs have some different habits from true Boar.

True Boar, the sows only breed once a year (usually around the first hard frost here). The grown Boars (18 months or older) may trail the sounder in the early fall, but are usually off by themselves or sometimes in young brother pairs. The Sows usually won't tolerate a full grown Boar in the sounder as long as there are squeakers around. The old timers say it is because sometimes the grown Boar will eat the squeakers. I've seen some really noisy fights when the lead sow drives off a grown Boar. Likely different with Hybrid Hogs, they come in season any old time and the social dynamic changes some.

*Most* times when I saw a single or a pair of Hogs come in early to feed they were around 18 months old and sows. I always figured they were know it all teenagers and weren't real big on following orders. They broke off from the sounder and cut corners or ran ahead to be the first on food.

The idea of them sending out scouts is new to me, but I don't doubt it. Pigs are way smarter than most Dogs. I've seen them weave a route through the countryside trying to avoid shooting towers, stands and choke points. The only reason I can think of for them to take the long way around consistently, is to avoid danger.

I've also seen them travel in formations, very much like a infantry platoon in enemy territory. Too precise to be an accident, topping a hill in a line abreast formation (shoulder to shoulder) then switching to a rough V formation with the squeakers near the middle.

Most times they travel in a gaggle, with the lead Sow near the front and two or three Sergeants (grown Sows) kind of surrounding her. Sometimes the teenagers (18 months or so) try to break ranks and race ahead. I've watched the lead Sow beat the heck out of teenagers and bully them back into the pack, to keep them from breaking cover and heading into a clearing.

Usually when I am hunting a grown Boar, I watch a sounder come in to eat and then wait for up to half an hour (or more) for a Boar to show up. They often trail the sounder. And often don't mix in well, the lead Sow positions herself between the Boar and the rest of the sounder, it appears adversarial most times (10-11 months a year).
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Old 10-03-2015, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by falcon
They don't scatter when fired upon. It's probably a response to being chased by dogs. i see it south of Walters, OK where hog doggers operate. The sounder bunches up tight, runs and refuses to be brought to bay.

A college classmate inherited a huge estate in Austria that hosts boar hunts. She says the boars there stage, wait and usually send out "point" pigs. i'll hunt on that estate next year.

i often hunt along the Red River where sounders of 60-80 hogs are common. Those big sounders are often accompanied by 2-4 large boars.
If you want a partner let me know, I'm game. I could likely give you some pointers and do's and don'ts, translate some. I'd just like to check it out, I can sit quiet and know the horn signals for a drive hunt. First time hunters here can get a little overwhelmed, most of it is common sense, but takes a little getting used to.
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Old 10-03-2015, 12:50 PM
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Originally Posted by falcon
A college classmate inherited a huge estate in Austria that hosts boar hunts. She says the boars there stage, wait and usually send out "point" pigs. i'll hunt on that estate next year.

i often hunt along the Red River where sounders of 60-80 hogs are common. Those big sounders are often accompanied by 2-4 large boars.
Given that sounders are dominated and controlled by female hogs, it seems odd that there is a claim of boars "sending out" pigs.

http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn74170.html
Wild pigs live in matrilineal groups called sounders that are led by a dominant female. While males are nomadic and are known to move about within their home range, females tend to stay in their familial groups with 80% of females remaining with the sounder in which they were reared.
http://feralhogs.tamu.edu/frequently...ons-wild-pigs/
A “sounder” is a family group of pigs made up of sows (typically related via about 3 generations) and their piglets. Pigs are completely weaned by about 3 months of age, although they have been observed eating solid food (e.g., corn) at as young as 2 weeks of age. About 80% of the yearling females remain with the sounder and the rest disperse. Young males disperse from the sounder at about 16 to 18 months of age. There is some research that supports the idea that sounders can become territorial– but not the individual pigs.
http://www.suwanneeriverranch.com/wi...s-breeding.htm
Maternal family groups can travel together as well as back each other against danger. These groups are called "drifts" or "sounders". The boars though are solitary.

Boars will mate with any sow in season, often battling for the opportunity, and do not remain to perform any familial duties.
Yes, large sounders may be accompanied by a couple of boars, most likely because there are sows coming into heat.
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Old 10-03-2015, 01:28 PM
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it seems odd that there is a claim of boars "sending out" pigs.
Boars in the context of Eurasian boars in Austria. Of course boar (male), hogs do not "send out" pigs.
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Old 10-03-2015, 02:34 PM
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The names confuse me also, here we have a different name for each growth stage, male, female and younguns. Wildschwein or Schwartzwild is the generic name. Keiler is an adult male Boar. Bache is the adult female, sometimes Sau. Uberläufer is newly sexually mature, either sex, or from around six months to a year and a half. Frischlinge is before sexual maturity.

Either English needs some more words for Wild Pigs or I've yet to learn them.

I use just Boar as the generic term often and am probably wrong in doing so. If I try the translation app from German to English I get nothing for Wildschwein or Schwartzwild. Maybe I should just stick with Boar, Sow and Wild Hogs? Maybe Wild Boar as the generic term and Boar as the male term?

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