Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > Firearms Forum > Guns
Help Understanding Shotgun Chokes >

Help Understanding Shotgun Chokes

Guns Like firearms themselves, there's a wide variety of opinions on what's the best gun.

Help Understanding Shotgun Chokes

Old 02-24-2014, 07:22 PM
  #1  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Bulletproof_JBE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 53
Default Help Understanding Shotgun Chokes

I'll just be honest, Iv'e been target shooting and hunting Whitetail my whole life and I never once heard anyone talk about choke tubes on a Shotgun, but then again the people who I hunt with only deer hunt so I guess Choke Tubes don't mean anything as far as that goes.

This year im going to take up bird hunting as well as turkey hunting. I have done a bit of research online about what type of equipment I will need and such, and I keep seeing the word Turkey Choke, modified choke, etc. I'm so extremely confused by this. I understand what the purpose of a choke is, to keep the spread tighter, but I have absolutely no clue what to get, or if the shotgun I have even has a choke tube in.

I just have a Remington 870 Express 20 guage. I put my finger in the barrel, I can feel a thread like texture, but im not sure if its the choke or just the rifled barrel. I went to the store and bought a box of Winchester Super X Upland and Small Game Ammunition. 2 3/4 inches, 1210 Velocity, 7/8 oz, 7 1/2 shot. I stood no further than about 10 yards away from the target, and the spread barely hit the target! It was way off to the right.

Is this normal? I mean, I never bird hunted and I know all you need is for just one of the pellets to connect, but I feel like they should be a bit tighter, especially at that distance.

So I want to bird hunt and Turkey hunt, what should I do? I don't really have the $$$ to just go buy another Shotgun right now, I can buy a choke but I just have no clue what to get. Do I need a separate choke for bird hunting and a separate choke for turkey hunting? Or is there a Choke that will work for both? what kind of ammo should I be getting? Etc.

Anything information what so ever will be HIGHLY appreciated!
Bulletproof_JBE is offline  
Old 02-24-2014, 07:48 PM
  #2  
Giant Nontypical
 
Sheridan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location:
Posts: 5,130
Default

Ask for George;

http://www.trulockchokes.com/
Sheridan is offline  
Old 02-24-2014, 08:32 PM
  #3  
Nontypical Buck
 
Nomercy448's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 3,898
Default

Is it a rifled barrel, or a smoothbore barrel? If you shine a flashlight into the breech and look down the barrel, is it rifled the full length, or not?

Shooting an internally threaded shotgun without a choke installed is not good. You will destroy your threading, damage your barrel, destroy the resale value of your firearm, plastic foul badly, and potentially cause a plastic build up that could cause a wad stall, and subsequent shot to blow up your firearm.

Cease and desist.

Shine a flashlight into the muzzle. If it's threaded for a choke, and the choke isn't present, you'll be able to see distinct threading within the first few inches of the muzzle. Looking end on at the muzzle, you'll also be able to see a "tube in a tube" at the end if the choke is installed. If it's a rifled barrel, then you'll see rifling the entire length of the bore.

Shooting shot out of a rifled barrel isn't recommended, for a variety of reasons. Primarily, because there is no constriction in the choke in a rifled barrel, which expands your spread, and the rotation of the shot is thought to "doughnut" your pattern.

You can't rely upon just "one pellet to connect" while bird hunting. In competitive clay shooting, we call that "the golden pellet", to mean that that ONE pellet was incredibly lucky. You DO need a better pattern.

How big was the spread at 10yrds? It should still be very small.

For upland hunting, you'll likely want an Improved or Modified choke. For turkey, you likely will want a Full or X-full choke. For upland shot, I run 7 1/2's or 8's, for turkey shot, I run 5's.
Nomercy448 is offline  
Old 02-25-2014, 02:59 AM
  #4  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: west central wi USA
Posts: 2,237
Default

If you can feel the threads, there is no choke tube in your barrel. The interior of the muzzle is threaded to accept a choke tube. You have to insert the choke tube into the barrel and screw it in. The fact that you pattern spread so much at close range, also indicates you have no choke tube. If none came with the gun, you need to go out and buy a couple. By the way, don't use your gun without a choke tube in it. If you wreck those threads or dent the thin barrel wall at the muzzle, you'll never get a tube in.
Wingbone is offline  
Old 02-25-2014, 06:03 PM
  #5  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 921
Default

Great advice this far.

You will need at least two different chokes. One for Turkey Hunting and one for Bird Hunting. Fortunately, they aren't too expensive. Chokes come as follows:

1) Improved Cylinder - wide pattern shortest range. Good for hunting in the trees for Grouse as an example.

2) Modified - A little tighter good for many bird hunting applications and a must when shooting steel shot.

3) Full - Tightest groups. best for long range hunting but accuracy is a must as your pattern will be tight.

4) Extra Full - These are your Turkey Chokes. One could write a novel on which is best. do some research but if you call the birds in close, you can use any choke.

What you need depends on how you wish to use the gun and what shells you plan on using. Lot's of options.
Josmund is offline  
Old 02-25-2014, 06:56 PM
  #6  
Typical Buck
 
DJfan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 592
Default

I use a modified for dove and quail and 6 shot - those euros are tough!

Use a full for goose and duck. Sometimes a modified for duck if we are jumping canals.

Use a full for turkey.

My boy downed his first turkey with a modified last year.

Please do what the posters above have said about getting it looked at. If you are shooting without the choke in, those threads will grab gunk and turn it into a time bomb for you.
DJfan is offline  
Old 02-25-2014, 08:09 PM
  #7  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Bulletproof_JBE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 53
Default

thank you guys so much for all the information! I definitely have a much better understanding now after reading these responses.
Bulletproof_JBE is offline  
Old 02-25-2014, 11:48 PM
  #8  
Nontypical Buck
 
Nomercy448's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Kansas
Posts: 3,898
Default

Originally Posted by hookeye
Might get powder residue and maybe wad contamination on threads but wouldn't the wad offer protection of said threads (when no choke tube present)?

And wouldn't they (threads of barrel) be at larger OD than bore, reducing the chance of contact?

Proly not recommended due to having carbon/powder/plastic fouling of threads and seating a choketube later in them, getting it stuck.
Hell lots of folks stick choke tubes and tear up barrels trying to get 'em out.

Just did some web research............lots of BS on quite a few forums. The internet..........and nothing of any real scientific substance.

Oh well, I wouldn't shoot my rigs without choketubes due to removal making for thin barrel wall more easily damaged.
You make the assumption that the shot stays perfectly packed within the mouth of the shot cup for the full length of the barrel, and that the shotgun will have no muzzle blast.

The most damaging effect I would anticipate, worse than pellet "dings" would be from the "fire jet" that would occur since the threads are slightly larger diameter than the wad and shotcup. As that thin sliver of space opens up, the pressure behind the shotcup suddenly has a vent, and the gasses "purge" at an exceedingly high velocity. This has a "blow torch" effect on threading, just like it will on rifling if a barrel has a wide spot. (Differential pressure, gas velocity, etc).

So again, no, you shouldn't be shooting internally threaded barrels without the choke installed.
Nomercy448 is offline  
Old 02-26-2014, 05:09 AM
  #9  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Bulletproof_JBE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 53
Default

Originally Posted by Josmund
Great advice this far.

You will need at least two different chokes. One for Turkey Hunting and one for Bird Hunting. Fortunately, they aren't too expensive. Chokes come as follows:

1) Improved Cylinder - wide pattern shortest range. Good for hunting in the trees for Grouse as an example.

2) Modified - A little tighter good for many bird hunting applications and a must when shooting steel shot.

3) Full - Tightest groups. best for long range hunting but accuracy is a must as your pattern will be tight.

4) Extra Full - These are your Turkey Chokes. One could write a novel on which is best. do some research but if you call the birds in close, you can use any choke.

What you need depends on how you wish to use the gun and what shells you plan on using. Lot's of options.
Wouldn't a Full Choke work for both bird and Turkey Hunting?

Edit: if I actually read alittle further, you did say you could really use any choke for Turkey Hunting if you call them in close
Bulletproof_JBE is offline  
Old 02-26-2014, 06:44 AM
  #10  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Bulletproof_JBE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 53
Default

Originally Posted by Nomercy448
Is it a rifled barrel, or a smoothbore barrel? If you shine a flashlight into the breech and look down the barrel, is it rifled the full length, or not?

Shooting an internally threaded shotgun without a choke installed is not good. You will destroy your threading, damage your barrel, destroy the resale value of your firearm, plastic foul badly, and potentially cause a plastic build up that could cause a wad stall, and subsequent shot to blow up your firearm.

Cease and desist.

Shine a flashlight into the muzzle. If it's threaded for a choke, and the choke isn't present, you'll be able to see distinct threading within the first few inches of the muzzle. Looking end on at the muzzle, you'll also be able to see a "tube in a tube" at the end if the choke is installed. If it's a rifled barrel, then you'll see rifling the entire length of the bore.

Shooting shot out of a rifled barrel isn't recommended, for a variety of reasons. Primarily, because there is no constriction in the choke in a rifled barrel, which expands your spread, and the rotation of the shot is thought to "doughnut" your pattern.

You can't rely upon just "one pellet to connect" while bird hunting. In competitive clay shooting, we call that "the golden pellet", to mean that that ONE pellet was incredibly lucky. You DO need a better pattern.

How big was the spread at 10yrds? It should still be very small.

For upland hunting, you'll likely want an Improved or Modified choke. For turkey, you likely will want a Full or X-full choke. For upland shot, I run 7 1/2's or 8's, for turkey shot, I run 5's.
Just checked the barrel out. It is in fact a fully rifled barrel. So this means what, I cant put a choke inside this? I will either need to buy a new barrel and then buy a choke, or just get a new Shotgun?
Bulletproof_JBE is offline  

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.