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Don't Think For A Minute....

Old 08-05-2009, 02:40 PM
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.... that flaoting and glassing won't improve your gun. As many of you know I have been a little ticked at my Remington 700's every since I got an A-bolt in 30.06. I took them to a GS and had them glassed and flaoted in hopes that they would shoot as good as my A-bolt. I had already had trigger jobs done on all of them including the A-bolt. I'm glad to say that my Remington 300 ultra mag, and my Remington BDL .243 now shoot every bit as good as the A-bolt. I just wish they would have came that way from the factory.

I have slimmed down my hunting rifles over this last year in hopes of getting good at shooting just a few instead of shooting a bunch of them just average or below. I'm down to my 300RUM, A-bolt 30.06, Rem 700 .243, Savage .223 and my 22 LR's. The Savage is now the worst shooter out of all of them. It shoots okay but not as good as my rifles are shooting since I got the A-bolt and glassed and floated the barrels on the Remington.
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Old 08-05-2009, 04:44 PM
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Just out of curiosity, what did it cost you to have your Rem 700 floated and glassed?

Mike
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Old 08-05-2009, 05:32 PM
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I glass-bedded the action & floated the barrel on my muzzleloader - I did the job myself for about $25 and 3 hours of work. This was a cheap-o muzzleloader, so I'm not suggesting that anyone screw up an expensive rifle if they don't know what they are doing. But I had never done it before - just read a lot, got some pictures from some other guys who had done it, read the glass-bedding instructions, and went ahead and did it.

In my case, the muzzy's best groups were about 2.5" at 100 yards (3 shot groups) - after the job, the best group has been 1.25" - a pretty noticeable improvement.
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Old 08-05-2009, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by oldsmellhound
I glass-bedded the action & floated the barrel on my muzzleloader - I did the job myself for about $25 and 3 hours of work. This was a cheap-o muzzleloader, so I'm not suggesting that anyone screw up an expensive rifle if they don't know what they are doing. But I had never done it before - just read a lot, got some pictures from some other guys who had done it, read the glass-bedding instructions, and went ahead and did it.

In my case, the muzzy's best groups were about 2.5" at 100 yards (3 shot groups) - after the job, the best group has been 1.25" - a pretty noticeable improvement.
I hear ya. I understand the basic process, but I'm too afraid to attempt it on my (rather expensive, for me anyway) rifle, because if I screw up, the results can be permanent or very difficult to fix.

Mike
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Old 08-05-2009, 06:16 PM
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The instructor at the gunsmithing school here in Denver did the work for me. He charged me 80 bucks a gun (no tax) and had a very short turn around time (5 days). The closest I could find to that was 115 bucks a gun plus tax and a turn around time of 4 to 6 weeks. I think he did a great job and I will be using him in the future for anything else I need.

If any of you guys are from around Denver, send me a pm and I will send you his contact info.

Last edited by Colorado Luckydog; 08-05-2009 at 06:44 PM.
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Old 08-05-2009, 07:17 PM
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I graduated from CST myself. Did the instructor actually do the work or did a student do the work? Typically the students do all of the work at CST. Which instructor did you talk to?
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Old 08-05-2009, 08:07 PM
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Bed that Savage and leave the tang floated. Then you can see what it will do! Or come do to Pueblo and I'll do it for the price of a package of JB Weld. ~$5
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Old 08-06-2009, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by bigbulls
I graduated from CST myself. Did the instructor actually do the work or did a student do the work? Typically the students do all of the work at CST. Which instructor did you talk to?
I didn't take it to the school. Ryan Lishner is the guy and he did the work himself at his shop at home. However, I have had a student do a couple of trigger jobs at the school that turned out great.
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Old 08-06-2009, 04:52 PM
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Originally Posted by #40Fan
Bed that Savage and leave the tang floated. Then you can see what it will do! Or come do to Pueblo and I'll do it for the price of a package of JB Weld. ~$5
Is that all I need to do to make it shoot as good or better than the rest? I wish Pueblo was as close as it sounds! LMAO
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Old 08-09-2009, 07:45 PM
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I do a little gunsmithing on the side, not a whole lot but some. Bedding is really easy to do and would be hard to mess up with some good instructions. Floating is not too bad to do but I dont want to tell you to go ahead and try it yourself. I dont have alot of tools so I do my floating with a dremel tool and sandpaper. The process is simple but be patient and dont cut your stock in half or anything!
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