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Shoulder Problems

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Old 05-09-2016, 09:18 PM
  #21  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
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My suggestion is to start with a 243 Winchester.

They hardly kick and have far far more power and range than any bow.

So if you don't have a 243 hunting rifle get that first.

If you already have one then get a cross bow.

No noise and you can shoot it in the basement.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Barnett-BC...ssbow/37184317

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Old 05-27-2016, 11:07 AM
  #22  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Default One of the many reasons...

we have so many hunters who become disabled. It is the attempt to stay a hunter while surviving an oxymoron -disabled.
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Old 06-10-2016, 08:46 AM
  #23  
Fork Horn
 
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Originally Posted by Samurile View Post
Hello I am new to the forum but one of the reasons I joined was because I have shoulder issues. It dislocated twice then I got orthoscopic surgery to prevent it from dislocating again. Well it dislocated again again a couple months ago right as deer hunting here in NC started getting going. Well long story short I'm very limited as what I can do. I don't hunt from a tree stand but am unable to shoot anything other than a .22. Can you guys give me some advice on good guns to use that won't hurt or bother my shoulder that much.
Thanks
300 Blackout in AR-15 platform with a muzzle brake that has two big openings if your state allows ARs for hunting. My father has one in that setup and it feels like shooting a 22lr. And is extremely lethal on deer out to 250 yards. I know when we shot his with factory ammo he was getting just over MOA at 200 yards.. Yes 200 yards with a 300 blackout. The muzzle blast from the blackout is not bad at all. His .243 without a muzzle break has more muzzle blast than the blackout. It also isn't hard to find ammo in stores. If people try to tell you other wise that a blackout won't work on deer I have a good picture to show from one buck that was shot at 150 yards using the 110gr Barnes TacTX. Also like others have said the .243 is also another great choice and one of my favorite cartidges, but in your situation I think a Blackout in an AR-15 would be a great alternative especially with the minimal recoil, the fact you can adjust the stock to fit your shoulder if you can't move your shoulder as much, The fact you don't have to move your hand to rotate a bolt ( have a friend that has a torn rotator cuff that uses an AR over a bolt because of this reason), and also you can make them pretty light and still have very minimal recoil. I remember when he shot that buck he said that was the first time he was able to watch a bullet hit a deer and drop still looking through the scope. Hope that gives you an idea of the very low recoil that cartridge has with the brake. Even though without the brake it still feels like a .223.. Oh and if you want you can also shoot a blackout suppressed

Last edited by Brandon_SPC; 06-10-2016 at 10:29 AM.
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Old 11-23-2016, 08:06 PM
  #24  
Fork Horn
 
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The left hander would not have to get a left hand gun.

A buddy who is left handed always shot RH guns left handed. Of course a gun made for left hand would be wanted but all those other guns can be shot left handed.
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Old 11-25-2016, 04:16 AM
  #25  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
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Default I had bad shoulder before the internet

Remember it well. Couldn't shoot a rifle or shotgun with the one shoulder. Was so small and light when young , I couldn't shoot a 30-30 with either shoulder.
Got into hunting late. With practice later used the shoulder opposite my power eye. Glad nobody called me disabled.
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Old 12-10-2016, 04:33 PM
  #26  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Default A shoulder injury

sure disabled me for awhile. In fact I switched from my power eyed side. Practice, practice, practice got me off the disabled list. And it wasn't a walk in the park, either.
And I never switched back to my old shoulder. Even when I could. Didn't have need of a left handed rifle or shotgun.

Last edited by Valentine; 12-10-2016 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 12-20-2016, 07:45 PM
  #27  
Spike
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
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Default Thumbhole Stock

I got a Boyds thumbhole stock for my 30-6 ( https://www.boydsgunstocks.com/desig...ment-gunstocks ) I don't even notice the recoil any more.
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Old 12-26-2016, 01:29 PM
  #28  
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If you are looking at a crossbow I recommend any 10 pt product with the accu draw crank handle
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Old 02-11-2017, 06:27 PM
  #29  
Fork Horn
 
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It takes quite a hard physical effort to cock my crossbow. Thus a person with any shoulder problems must consider that.

I use a pulley device and pull both it's handles back at the same time to cock my Recruit Recurve crossbow. The pulley cocking device is marked Barnett and OMP.

It's hard to cock it pulling the handles back. A person with physical problems might not be able to do it without pain.

http://www.barnettcrossbows.com/acce...troke-up-to-15

Last edited by Savage_99; 02-11-2017 at 07:16 PM.
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Old 02-11-2017, 07:25 PM
  #30  
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A lot of good advice although I wouldn't recommend a 17 HMR for deer. You may want to try cocking a crossbow first before purchasing one. A buddy has a shoulder injury (got shot several times in the shoulder with a .22 while on duty and can't bow hunt anymore. Cocking a crossbow may or may not aggravate your shoulder so it would be wise to find out before you buy.

For a coyote, have you considered a 223, a 17 centerfire or even a 17 WSM (rimfire)? All of them are little to no recoil and would be good for coyotes (obviously the 17 WSM at shorter ranges). If you were to limit yourself to 50 yards on coyotes, you could use a 22 mag with good shot placement.

Your state probably requires a certain minimum caliber for deer hunting. You should ascertain your state's requirements as that may partially answer your question. If you go the AR15 route with a 300 Blackout upper, you could always use it for 5.56/223 as well. If you need to step up to 243 for deer, have you considered one of the recoil reducing systems available? They're fairly inexpensive. I bought a slip on pad for a 45-70 that had a length of pull that was too short. The pad fixed that and also reduced the recoil considerably.

Hopefully some of this is helpful. Let us know what you figure out and how well it works.
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