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Dry fire question.

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Dry fire question.

Old 06-02-2007, 09:14 PM
  #1  
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Default Dry fire question.

Not trying to start a dispute. I know that people have dry fired a crossbow and had severe damage happen. I don't need to know about all the damage. My question is simple, why does the damage happen? Does the arrow supply that much resisitance that it prevents damage? Is it because the string waves or something? I am just confused as to why a dry fire is so hazardous to the crossbow. Thank you for your help.
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Old 06-02-2007, 09:55 PM
  #2  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Default RE: Dry fire question.

ORIGINAL: Scrapdawg

Not trying to start a dispute. I know that people have dry fired a crossbow and had severe damage happen. I don't need to know about all the damage. My question is simple, why does the damage happen? Does the arrow supply that much resisitance that it prevents damage? Is it because the string waves or something? I am just confused as to why a dry fire is so hazardous to the crossbow. Thank you for your help.
Ibelieve you will find it's equally hazardous to all forms of bows and is due to lack of resistance of an arrows weight. I don't know the exact laws of pyhsics involved, but am sure some one can explain it fully.
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Old 06-02-2007, 11:10 PM
  #3  
Dnk
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Default RE: Dry fire question.

Like any other bow the arrow absorbs the energy. If the arrow isn't there the limbs take the excess energy but they can't dampen the impulse of excess energy. So the limbs and or string say goodbye. Well constructed bows and strings can deal with some but most are at the edge for perfomance reasons. In other words the ultra high performace limbs and strings are made light to perform at max and they don't have enough mass that absorbs the energy.
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Old 06-03-2007, 08:52 AM
  #4  
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Default RE: Dry fire question.

ORIGINAL: Dnk

Like any other bow the arrow absorbs the energy. If the arrow isn't there the limbs take the excess energy but they can't dampen the impulse of excess energy. So the limbs and or string say goodbye. Well constructed bows and strings can deal with some but most are at the edge for perfomance reasons. In other words the ultra high performace limbs and strings are made light to perform at max and they don't have enough mass that absorbs the energy.
I was trying to figure out how to explain this one and could not, can I call you Professor DNK,
Martin
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Old 06-03-2007, 09:00 AM
  #5  
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Default RE: Dry fire question.

Nah Martin,we should call Doctor,there is a higher force here then just
a Professor,hehehe!
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