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Am I wrong?

Old 09-02-2010, 12:30 PM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by *twodogs*
Unfortunately, to me this thread is beginning to smell of the "bow hunters vs the orange army" complaining I hear all the time. Some really elitist comments from some of you that in my opinion, further divide the gun hunters from the bow hunters
What did you read in this thread that you consider "elistist"? I'm just curious. I hunt with rifles, muzzleloaders, compounds and trad bows so I know I'm not an elitist. I'm just particular about the company I keep.
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Old 09-02-2010, 01:17 PM
  #42  
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Well, yes and no. I'd discourage anyone from picking up a bow and start hunting within a week. That said, proper coaching with todays modern compounds will get you hitting the bullseye over and over in a short time. I had my buddy up 3 times between May and August. He didn't practice much outside of that... but some. I had him hitting the bullseye in a no time and stacking arrows tight at 20 in a couple lessons. He killed 4 deer that fall. He killed 8 last fall, his second season. Mind you, the bow was tuned and set up for his draw length from the get go. All he had to do was listen and shoot. A couple key preshot routines will help him not to panick. You got to talk him through it. For Pete's sake, he's your brother-in-law. Talk him through it, help him get a bow, teach him(short lessons at first) Don't over bow or over draw him. He should be ready in a couple weeks to try it. No way would I tell my brother in law or nephews or close friends... you're out because I don't think you're good enough. Let him find that out. Help him understand. Teach him. Heck, how many bad shots and hits do you see from "THE Experts" on TV. He can't be that bad. It's not rocket science. Yes you may practice all year and you benefit from it, the ability to hold for long times and all that. 20 yard shots become slam dunks.... but not everyone is geared that way. Give him a chance and a helping hand.

Last edited by davidmil; 09-02-2010 at 01:19 PM.
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Old 09-02-2010, 01:41 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by UPHunter08
"Just about anyone can learn to shoot a gun with a scope and hit somewhat accurately in a short amount of time, but bow hunting requires an entirely different level of skill."
That is elitist IMO. It's basically the same principals only applied to a different hunting implement: control your breathing, pick your spot, squeeze the trigger....Gotta agree with the above post....Twenty and in is a slam dunk with todays modern bows......

Bow hunting requires more knowledge of shot placement and your effective range. It also requires more scouting work because our range is limited. You must know their patterns so stand placement works to your advantage - not as critical with gun for obvious reasons.

I've given someone a tuned bow who is a good shot with a gun and they are drilling arrows in tight groups at 20 yards with a little instruction. The ability to judge yardage...nah, get a range finder.

Where he might have trouble is his buck fever since bow hunters are right there with the deer. And I agree with you, wouldn't put him in my "go to" stands either until he's out there doing the pre-season work as well.

Last edited by *twodogs*; 09-02-2010 at 02:08 PM.
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Old 09-02-2010, 03:03 PM
  #44  
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Use your best judgment on when you think he's ready. Make it a point for you two to shoot together as much as possible so you can help him out. He could be ready in a week, or two months, but remember he'll never truly learn the sheer challenge without experience in the stand. Heck, he may not even get to full draw on a deer, or he may shoot a perfect shot...hard to predict, but you know how experienced he is in general when it comes to hunting.

I believe the best experience is in the woods. Also, IMO, the chosen stands are up to the hunter with the ownership/rights to the land and the guest gets what is left.
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Old 09-02-2010, 05:10 PM
  #45  
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Not wrong but,imo,atleast see what he can do with the bow first.He might be a natural,if so,I wouldn't hesitate letting him go.
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Old 09-02-2010, 06:15 PM
  #46  
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Originally Posted by *twodogs*
That is elitist IMO. It's basically the same principals only applied to a different hunting implement: control your breathing, pick your spot, squeeze the trigger....
Heh...if you think asking someone to spend a little extra time to become familiar with their equipment is elitist, so be it. I plead guilty. I gun hunt and bow, for the record. I can tell you it was much easier mastering hunting with a gun than it was with a bow. I think most of us here would agree that it takes less skill to take down a deer with a scoped rifle at 100 yards than it does one with a bow at 30-35 yards.

If there's no difference in skill level and practice required, please explain to me why there are far fewer archers than gun hunters.

I do agree with you that 20 yards and in is a lot easier, but a lot of new bow hunters don't often know the difference between a 20 yard shot and a 40 yard one...and we're simply saying that they usually need more than a couple days of practice to really be ready to know the difference.

I think some of you are reading a lot more into comments like mine than was intended. All we're saying is that the guy probably needs a little more preparation than he thinks. That's all. When he's ready to go, it will be apparent.

Last edited by UPHunter08; 09-02-2010 at 06:17 PM.
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Old 09-02-2010, 07:20 PM
  #47  
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this is getting ridiculous. His stands, his ground and his rules. Let him chose what to do. If his BIL is ready then he will know it. As for your set ups. Thats up to you, but I know how much sweat and time goes into a good setup. I would say if he gets good with a bow sometime during season, you two should go out and put a couple of sets in for him. Don't ruin your setups but find a good place for him to sit so you both can have a good hunt. But in no way should you feel its your duty to put him in your best stands
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Old 09-04-2010, 05:39 AM
  #48  
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Thanks everyone for the input, I have decided not to let him hunt our farm, on the other side of the county we have two more properties about 70 acres total that my father is going to let him hunt. Those were my little honey holes and im going to show him where I normally set up. Good luck everyone
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Old 09-04-2010, 01:44 PM
  #49  
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Originally Posted by stabnslab_WI
Thanks everyone for the input, I have decided not to let him hunt our farm, on the other side of the county we have two more properties about 70 acres total that my father is going to let him hunt. Those were my little honey holes and im going to show him where I normally set up. Good luck everyone
Well let's review. What does HOCKEY have to do with it. And he killed a couple nice bucks. You aren't afraid he'll kill another are you? LOL "How To Win Friends and Influence People" is a great book. It could also be named how to get along with the inlaws? LOL I think you're being a little jealous and pissy about it. You willing to let him gun hunt like he has in the past? Obviously you don't want to help him. I say you're causing trouble in the family tree. Dang boy, he's your brother in law... not a stranger.

Besides that, I see in another post where you said he's showed you up twice and it has become a big competition between you, your father and your brother in law when gun season comes around. After further review I think you're being childish and trying to throw the competition out. Your biggest mistake is making hunting a competition. It's about you and the animal. You win or lose depending on your skills. Don't blame someone else for your failures if he succeeds and you don't. Congratulate him and learn.

Last edited by davidmil; 09-04-2010 at 01:51 PM.
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Old 09-04-2010, 05:03 PM
  #50  
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Originally Posted by UPHunter08
I think most of us here would agree that it takes less skill to take down a deer with a scoped rifle at 100 yards than it does one with a bow at 30-35 yards.

If there's no difference in skill level and practice required, please explain to me why there are far fewer archers than gun hunters.
I dont agree with you at all. I bet most people who claim they have "mastered" the "scoped rifle" cant shoot an 8" group off hand at 100 yards.

The reason there are more gun hunters is because some people dont like to "feel" limited to 30-35 yards. Guns make people feel more powerful.
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