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Big Name guys...

Old 08-05-2007, 10:24 PM
  #21  
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

ORIGINAL: goos_blues

I think the way the professionals hunt, is lot different than they way I and anybody else I know hunts. Honestly, I dont think they would much advice to offer. I think alot of the professionals would feel awkward on the this site, since they would probably learn more, than they could actually ever teach anyone. Idon'tvisit the archers choice forum verymuch because of this. Not thatI have anything against them, I would more than likely make of living off of hunting IfI could too. However; whenit comes to advice,the professionals probably havemuch less to offer as compared toother people on this site.
I agree for the most part. While some of these guys and gals are probably excellent hunters or were at one time excellent hunters, it seems like most of them do verylittle of there own hunting. They get on the camera and talk about scouting, tree stand placement, etc. , but when it comes down to it, 95% of there hunts are guided. Don't get me wrong, I don't think there is anything wrong with a guided hunt. When you go to a different state and are required to kill something large or you kids don't eat, what choice do you have. I just wonder what kind of advice be given bysomeone that has all of their scouting done for them, their treestands or blinds setin place before they get there, are driven to their stand by their guide, often told which deer they can or can't shoot, put on the very best spot the guide has to offer (free advertisement), and have their kill tracked, gutted, dragged, etc. for them. The only thing these guides don't do for them, is tie the deer to the tree. What advice could they offer, other than "make sure you promise to say the outfitters name five times so he'll put you on his biggest deer". I am amazed at all of the people that get on here and complain about high fence hunting on tv. "I'll never watch **** because I saw a high fence in the background", but no one says anything about the guy sitting over a food plot that someone else planted, hunting a deer that someone else paterned, and sitting in a blind that someone else built and placed in a perfect location. If you ask me there is no difference.

Even though I think of most of the TV hunting as what you guys call "canned hunts", I still really enjoy watching them for hours on end if I can't actually be out hunting of fishing. I also understand why they hunt how they do. How else could they get the amount of trouphy animals that there job requires. Also nothing against other hunters on here that hunt in the same manner. There is nothing wrong with it and often is the best way if hunting far from home. What I don't want is to get advice on hunting whitetails from a guy that thinks he is an expert, because he got a big buck in Kansas, even though all he did was show up and do what he was told. I am always more receptive to getting advice from someone that actually put all of the work in to harvest their trophy.

Maybe the guides for the tv personalitys can come on here and give advice, or maybe they already do.



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Old 08-05-2007, 10:28 PM
  #22  
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

Maybe I took to long to write that last post as by the time I was done writing it, some else had said the same thing.
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Old 08-05-2007, 10:30 PM
  #23  
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...


[/quote]

I agree for the most part. While some of these guys and gals are probably excellent hunters or were at one time excellent hunters, it seems like most of them do verylittle of there own hunting. They get on the camera and talk about scouting, tree stand placement, etc. , but when it comes down to it, 95% of there hunts are guided. Don't get me wrong, I don't think there is anything wrong with a guided hunt. When you go to a different state and are required to kill something large or you kids don't eat, what choice do you have. I just wonder what kind of advice be given bysomeone that has all of their scouting done for them, their treestands or blinds setin place before they get there, are driven to their stand by their guide, often told which deer they can or can't shoot, put on the very best spot the guide has to offer (free advertisement), and have their kill tracked, gutted, dragged, etc. for them. The only thing these guides don't do for them, is tie the deer to the tree. What advice could they offer, other than "make sure you promise to say the outfitters name five times so he'll put you on his biggest deer". I am amazed at all of the people that get on here and complain about high fence hunting on tv. "I'll never watch **** because I saw a high fence in the background", but no one says anything about the guy sitting over a food plot that someone else planted, hunting a deer that someone else paterned, and sitting in a blind that someone else built and placed in a perfect location. If you ask me there is no difference.

Even though I think of most of the TV hunting as what you guys call "canned hunts", I still really enjoy watching them for hours on end if I can't actually be out hunting of fishing. I also understand why they hunt how they do. How else could they get the amount of trouphy animals that there job requires. Also nothing against other hunters on here that hunt in the same manner. There is nothing wrong with it and often is the best way if hunting far from home. What I don't want is to get advice on hunting whitetails from a guy that thinks he is an expert, because he got a big buck in Kansas, even though all he did was show up and do what he was told. I am always more receptive to getting advice from someone that actually put all of the work in to harvest their trophy.

Maybe the guides for the tv personalitys can come on here and give advice, or maybe they already do.




I agree 100%
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Old 08-05-2007, 10:35 PM
  #24  
Fork Horn
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

Thats basically how I feel about it. Don't have any problem whatsoever with professional hunters. I just wouldn't look for guidence fromthem. I've noticed that today's hunting shows offer very few tipson aireanyway, I doubt they can think ofmuchelse to say in person. I would love to visit with some of the successful guides out there, these guys know what they are talking about. If they didn't know what they were talking about, the big names wouldn't rely on them to get big deer. I'm sure the well known hunters out there can get deer on their own, just not as easily if they have everything done for them.
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Old 08-05-2007, 10:38 PM
  #25  
Dominant Buck
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

Maybe I took to long to write that last post as by the time I was done writing it, some else had said the same thing.
And when you write a reply that's that long.... we children with attention deficit disorder really don't read past the first two or three lines.[&:]
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Old 08-06-2007, 05:30 AM
  #26  
Giant Nontypical
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

Im here!
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Old 08-06-2007, 06:55 AM
  #27  
Nontypical Buck
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

Personally, I avoid generalizations and assumptions. I do my homework and base my opinion, pertaining to the task at hand or the individual, on fact. Here are a few facts I know:

Both Jim Zumbo And Jim Shockey run guiding services (hunter becomes teacher, scout, etc...they've managed to blend the best of both worlds). Both men have killed numerous animals on their own-be it low fence, high fence, free range. open range , down range...these two individuals have got-r-done. Both have traveled the world hunting. Both have seen plentyand have plenty toshare with the rest of us. Did you know Zumbo haskilled a deer in all fifty states? I wonder how he did that? Some states don't allow baiting...and it wasn't all done with a guide service. Zumbo has killed everything North America has to offer and then some (exception: Coyote with AR). These two men simply love to hunt (What's wrong with that?)

Gary Bogner was the first man to complete SCI's World Hunting Award Program with archery equipment. Again, nearly every animal he killed was free ranging (there are exceptions). Many of the animals were killed without the aid of a guide. He huntspredominately with a cameraman-while spot and stalking. He's done the grand slam of north american sheep twice (I'm unaware ofa wild sheep hunt behind high fence-I think he can tell you a thing or two about altitude sickness). A guy by the name of Archie Nesbitt was the second man to complete SCI WHAP. I would die to share a beer and swap stories with either of these men! By the way, Gary's a guide also.

I'll stop the list there and spare DM the hassel of reading further.

Bottom line...

There's still plenty for us to learn if we keep open minds. To discount these fellow's adventures, because they're not yours, is doing yourself a huge disservice. Not allbig names huntersare the "Momma's boy"as portrayed. Again, there always exceptions...

I for one will embrace insight-when it's offered. It's a heck of a lot more useful, at least in my life, than trying to find and dwelling overthe tarnish on another man's armour.
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Old 08-06-2007, 07:26 AM
  #28  
 
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

ORIGINAL: iamyourhuckleberry

Are you telling me you couldn't learnanything from Craig Boddington, Jim Zumbo, Chuck Adams, Jim Shockey, Gary Bogner, Cindy Garrision?
I think Cindy could teach me a thing or two...or three!!
Oh did you guys mean about hunting? oops...
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Old 08-06-2007, 07:36 AM
  #29  
 
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Location: Wisconsin and Canada
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Default RE: Big Name guys...

ORIGINAL: iamyourhuckleberry


Bottom line...

There's still plenty for us to learn if we keep open minds. To discount these fellow's adventures, because they're not yours, is doing yourself a huge disservice. Not allbig names huntersare the "Momma's boy"as portrayed. Again, there always exceptions...

I for one will embrace insight-when it's offered. It's a heck of a lot more useful, at least in my life, than trying to find and dwelling overthe tarnish on another man's armour.

Amen Huck. It gets old listening to people trying to bring another person down. It must be a miserable life when one can only find things that are wrong with fellow hunters and not focus on the positive.

If people would try to be a little more positive, thier life would be a whole lot better.
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Old 08-06-2007, 08:53 AM
  #30  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 6
Default RE: Big Name guys...

I'm certainly not a "big name guy," and I hesitate to respond to message boards because it always turns into a ripfest, but I do want to comment.

One of the things that hurts all of us in every aspect of hunting is generalization. Because a poacher kills a buck at night, all hunters are smeared due to generalization. So pleasedon't generalize when it comes to TV/celebriity/writer hunters. Some TV hunters bought a camera and air time and became instant celebrities. Others have spent years working their way up to a point where someone would put them in front of a camera. Guys like Greg Miller, for example,did everything, scouting, treestand placement, bloodtrailing, etc., on their own for decades. They wrote about it, gained some notoriety and found themselves on TV.

Now, once a cameraman is involved,it is impossible to do all that pre-hunt work in several states. Who could run a string of trail cameras in four states, plus do the scouting and treestand placement? These guysmust get into a camp and get it done in a week. The good ones willmove stands at midnight, hunt all day long, stay cool under considerable pressure and use their experience to get it done in five or six days.It's just not feasible to do it all, mostly because none of us can be in two places at once.

I hunted elk for 22 years, almost all do-it-myself hunts on public land. I always gave myself two weeks so I had time to locate the elk and work my way intoan opportunity. You can't do that when taping a TV hunt. A guided hunt will get you into the elk quickly and while I often prefer to take off hunting by myself a good guide will save me the days I used to spent learning country. I still have to do the work and make the shot.

There are a lot of obstacles to making a television show, including having a 200 pound squirrel in a tree next to you, or bellycrawling behind you when hunting mule deer. I'm not complaining, and I love my job,but there are a lot of misconceptions out there. Some celebrity hunters are where they are because they have unlimited funds. Some are rich and highly skilled. Some areblue-collarand high-skilled and some rely solely on the skills of an outfitter and primo land. The point is they are all different so generalizing about "big name guys" isn't fair. Many, however, are excellent hunters who, if put in most hunting situations, and given the time, would hold their own very well. Flame away....
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