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What is a good beginner compound bow?

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What is a good beginner compound bow?

Old 01-10-2019, 05:06 AM
  #1  
Spike
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Default What is a good beginner compound bow?

Hello,
My son and I are wanting to take up bow hunting and were wondering if anyone has any suggestions on compound bows?
I know that everyone has their own preference but I would really like to know what you all are using.
Please any suggestion on equipment to add helps as well.
We are both beginners and my son is 6'3" 256 lbs.
Thanks,
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Old 11-08-2020, 04:46 AM
  #2  
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My goodness when you said your son I was imagining a small boy. Your son is a giant! Here is my opinion so take it for what its worth. I've been shooting bows since I could walk (before compounds) and I've been hunting for 55 years now so I have a bit of experience.
So here goes....If you're serious about archery hunting and are going to stick with it there is no need for a "beginner" bow. You might as well put your money up one time and be satisfied and have confidence in your bow. Go to as many archery shops as you can and try out as many bows as you can. You want a bow that feels comfortable for YOU. You and your son may have totally different feels on this so its possible you may not get the same bow model or even the same manufacturer.
Also, if you've never shot or haven't shot a bow much you soon realize that you'll be using muscles that you didn't use much before and they will require some toning up. I see you're in the NE so you don't need to shoot a monster 70+ bow. If you get one in the 45-60# range or even the 55-70# adjustment range you will be good for anything in North America. Start at a lower setting and slowly build up. For whitetails anything in the 45+ pound draw range is sufficient. Heavier will give you a little more speed and more penetration on a less than ideal arrow placement.
Also, broadheads are expensive these days. Again, my opinion, if you're going to shoot <50# draw use a fixed blade broadhead. If you go heavier you can look into the mechanicals. I prefer Rage Hypodermic 2 blade. NAP Spitfire is another good mechanical.
Good luck and practice, practice, practice.
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Old 11-08-2020, 05:19 AM
  #3  
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My suggestion is this, go to a few BOW shops, and ask them what they feel is good for him/you, there are tons of great bows on the market and there is NO need to buy the latest and greatest bows either, countless bows of the past decade are great bows(at one time many were the latest and greatest)
so don't rule out buying a used bow from a bow shop, as MANY MANY hunters trade bows in every yr to be the cool kid with the newest bows out there , and that means great savings on there like new used bows!
Bows have HIGH market up(I sold them so I kind of know this for a fact)
so when folks trade them in they normally take a beating unless being over charged on new one!

this again is why many bows sell privately over trade ins! and why trade ins have low values to bow shops, there kind of like new vehicles, as soon as your off the lot there used and worth a LOT less than you just paid LOL

But due the size of your boy, you really need to go to a local bow shop'/shop's, and get fitted properly to know what will fit him best and those make him shoot it the best

LOWER BRACE HEIGHT"S bows are easier to shoot well with, more forgiving, so IMO< they would be the TYPE to be looking for 7 inch or longer brace heights are what you want to learn on, you will learn faster and be better at things faster, and if down the road, you wish to upgrade, so be it,
why spend a TON getting into a sport you maybe won't like! again reason for a used bow over a new one as well!

if you buy used from a private seller, just have bow looked at , at a GOOD bow shop, have a new string put on, and overall bow inspected, and set up to FIT your boys, draw length, just DON"T buy a bow till you know what he needs and then stick to bows that can handle his set up needs(draw length, LBS of bow draw weight and so on)
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Old 11-08-2020, 12:14 PM
  #4  
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Sorry mrbb but I agree with almost everything you said except: the old adage that HIGHER (not lower) brace height is more forgiving is not true.
Please reference this link: https://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs...t-forgiveness/
My advice is to shoot as many bows as you can. And like mrbb said, you can save a bunch of money on a used but perfectly good bow.
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Old 03-24-2022, 02:12 PM
  #5  
Spike
 
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Default Compound bow

Best compound bow: HOYT TORREX & TORREX XT
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