Bowhunting Gear Review Broadheads, arrows, rests, bows, and more... read the latest reviews of hot new gear items related to archery and bowhunting.

Bow Buying Advice

Old 12-20-2010, 09:43 AM
  #1  
Spike
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 1
Exclamation Bow Buying Advice

I am trying to find a bow for my husband for Christmas. He has never bow hunted before but would like to try. I don't want to spend an arm and a leg for something he may or may not get into. Here are a few of the (used) bows I am considering. Can anyone offer any advice about which seem like good bows and/or good deals? I do not know the year on most of them. The information is all directly from the sellers, so I apologize if it's redundant or if there are any discrepancies.

I measured my husband's arm span (73.5) and figured he would need around a 29" draw (29.2-29.6). Are most bows listed at 28", 29", or 30" range adjustable to his specific length or only ones that give a range for the length?

1) PSE Polaris Game Sport Series $159
"may be an older bow"

2) Martin Tracer LT $175
55-70#, 29", with hard case & quiver

3) Parker Buck Hunter $200
70#, 28-30"

4) Fred Bear Element $249
60#, 28"
"about 3 years old"

5) Browning Spectrum II $160
60#+, 29-32", 65% let off, overdraw, soft case
"about 4-5 years old"

Thanks!!
CluelessWife
CluelessWife is offline  
Old 12-20-2010, 10:48 AM
  #2  
Nontypical Buck
 
halfbakedi420's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: central and east texas
Posts: 4,894
Default

well...better just give him some cash and let him pick his own....if ya dont wanna do that, find one and negotiate a few arrows and field tips, a couple broad heads...a release..just do the best ya can....usually guys will get new arrows when they get a new bow, so the old ones are "chump change" to them and will gladly let a few go just to get the sale of their old bow.... negotiating these extras will save ya in the long run....especially if he doesnt take to the sport, then you can just re-sale the package.
halfbakedi420 is offline  
Old 12-20-2010, 05:46 PM
  #3  
Nontypical Buck
 
BGfisher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Middletown PA United States
Posts: 3,625
Default

Originally Posted by CluelessWife View Post
I am trying to find a bow for my husband for Christmas. He has never bow hunted before but would like to try. I don't want to spend an arm and a leg for something he may or may not get into. Here are a few of the (used) bows I am considering. Can anyone offer any advice about which seem like good bows and/or good deals? I do not know the year on most of them. The information is all directly from the sellers, so I apologize if it's redundant or if there are any discrepancies.

I measured my husband's arm span (73.5) and figured he would need around a 29" draw (29.2-29.6). Are most bows listed at 28", 29", or 30" range adjustable to his specific length or only ones that give a range for the length?

1) PSE Polaris Game Sport Series $159
"may be an older bow"

2) Martin Tracer LT $175
55-70#, 29", with hard case & quiver

3) Parker Buck Hunter $200
70#, 28-30"

4) Fred Bear Element $249
60#, 28"
"about 3 years old"

5) Browning Spectrum II $160
60#+, 29-32", 65% let off, overdraw, soft case
"about 4-5 years old"

Thanks!!
CluelessWife

1) The PSE is way too old. Move on.

2) Tracer is about 5 years old. Depending on the cam I would pass on it, too. It's OK if it has the DynaCam. If it's a TruArc cam then move on.

3) Parker Buck Hunter is also about 5 years old, but was a fairly decent bow for it's day. Only problem is whether he can handle 70#. It'll adjust down to 60#, but may still be more than he should start with. And $200 is too much money imo.

4) Maybe the best choice of the bunch. I haven't kept up with the different models Bear produces, but they are usually decent bows for the money. A little "Google" shows it to be a 2006 model and only sold for $300 new, which would lead me to believe it's overpriced by $75 or so.

5) The Browning just doesn't fit into anything I can find. The only info I'm finding that refers to Spectrum II is that it's a youth bow from 1996-97 era. Can't be the one you're asking about. Even so, I have a feeling it would have to be an older bow because I don't know any body that has used an overdraw for many years. They lost their popularity at least ten years ago so I'd say it's too old. I'd pass on this one.

You did ask another question. And the aswer is YES. Most bows are draw lwngth adjustable, but there are a few that are draw length specific. This is just something you need to ask a seller if you are set on buying him a used one.

Although I commend you for the thought, choosing a bow (new or used) is a very personal matter, one that should be done by your husband, with you in tow of course. And he should be able to shoot any bow that the two of you find. Money doesn't grow on trees and you do want to get this right so as to get the best bang for the buck so what halfbaked suggested might be a good choice.
BGfisher is offline  
Old 12-20-2010, 06:31 PM
  #4  
Nontypical Buck
 
sconnyhunter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Wherever liberalism must be eradicated.
Posts: 2,730
Default

While I may have differing opinions about older PSE models than that of BGfisher.

They are very correct about picking bows being a very personal matter. The best option is to take your husband with when its time to pick one out. He must be fitted to the bow, as the bow must be fitted to him.
sconnyhunter is offline  
Old 12-21-2010, 07:24 AM
  #5  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,926
Default I am trying to find a bow for my husband for Christmas.

If I were a friend, I'd tell you to take the grown up out for his Christmas present and have him pick out his own present.
Valentine is offline  
Old 12-22-2010, 01:15 PM
  #6  
Nontypical Buck
 
Duckbutter48's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Berkeley Springs, WV
Posts: 1,293
Default

I would be very scared to buy any used bow without a good back ground of knowledge on them, I've been bow hunting for over 20 years and couldnt walk into a shop and just pick up a random 5 year bow and know much about it unless I previously owned something close to it. Someone could pass off junk and you prob wouldn't know the difference.

I would buy him a gift card to a local shop that sells used bows or yes even big box store with a "pro" shop. If he also hasn't bow hunted before he will have as many if not more questions then you will.

You guys could make a day/evening out of it. Let him goto shop learn something and start forming his own opinions and what "feel" he likes in a bow. If you buy something that is wrong for him he may never persue the sport thinking that just how bows feel.

He (I know I would) will prob appreciate the fact you put the time into planning a day kind of just for him. Plus you guys both get to enjoy the time together.

Just getting on here and asking was a really cool thing to do.
Duckbutter48 is offline  
Old 12-22-2010, 02:20 PM
  #7  
Typical Buck
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: southwestern va
Posts: 753
Default

yep i agree with all the other posters......plan A would be to either get him a gift card or the money and let him pick his own bow out. PlanB, if you decide to buy him one of the bows above i mainly have experience with parker...great company, lifetime warranty on bows and great to work with. I have a parker bow and crossbow, bought the crossbow used and needed a part, contacted parker expecting to pay for the part, told them i wasnt original owner but the guy was so nice, sent me the part free and expressed shipped it on top of that, hard to beat that.
scottycoyote is offline  
Old 12-22-2010, 02:52 PM
  #8  
Fork Horn
 
louie6014's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: NC
Posts: 196
Default

I just got into bow hunting the past year, and after learning the ins and outs of it, Ide highly recommend sending him to a local bow shop, and getting a bow set up for his needs there. Most usually have an affordable line up of bows, and used gear. Also all the 2011 stuff is coming in, so they are willing to sell the new last year stuff at great deals. There are tons of little adjustments that need to be made to make a bow shooter happy and comfortable, Ide recommend a pro shop for sure.
louie6014 is offline  
Old 12-24-2010, 12:39 AM
  #9  
Fork Horn
 
sixgunluvr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: WV
Posts: 487
Default Bow for Husband

#4 would be your pick out of those. It's not a bad choice at all. The Element was a sort of 'Economy/Quality" bow of its day 06/07.... If his draw length is more than an inch off of your guess you can buy a draw length module for it on ebay for around $15. The bow is probably 50-60lb. which is perfect. 50lb to start and 60lb will do all he will ever need. A few accessories in the deal would be nice...a few arrows, rest maybe, quiver, sight.....whatever you can get. Only thing he will need other than that stuff is a mechanical release(Tru-Fire Patriot would be a good starter $27)........ and a target to shoot at.

Then take your husband and his bow to an archery shop to make sure everything is setup correctly and they will make sure his draw length and arrow type are correct(arrow length and spine).

Last edited by sixgunluvr; 12-24-2010 at 12:44 AM.
sixgunluvr is offline  
Old 12-27-2010, 08:22 PM
  #10  
Typical Buck
 
huntingkidPA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 872
Default

bear charge 300$
huntingkidPA is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.