Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > General Hunting Forums > Big Game Hunting
Why is a lever job associated with deep-woods hunting? >

Why is a lever job associated with deep-woods hunting?

Big Game Hunting Moose, elk, mulies, caribou, bear, goats, and sheep are all covered here.

Why is a lever job associated with deep-woods hunting?

Reply

Old 04-12-2019, 04:59 AM
  #11  
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 531
Default

Ive always been rather amazed at the fact that the higher quality semi auto hunting rifles are not more popular
both my 270 win and 30/06 BAR's will consistently shoot every bit as tight groups as most bolt guns, with some loads,
I wish they were available in 35 whelen and 450 marlin calibers

Last edited by hardcastonly; 04-12-2019 at 05:02 AM.
hardcastonly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2019, 12:37 PM
  #12  
Giant Nontypical
 
flags's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: CO Born but working in Athens, TX for now.
Posts: 7,572
Default

Originally Posted by hardcastonly View Post
Ive always been rather amazed at the fact that the higher quality semi auto hunting rifles are not more popular
both my 270 win and 30/06 BAR's will consistently shoot every bit as tight groups as most bolt guns, with some loads,
I wish they were available in 35 whelen and 450 marlin calibers
For what it is worth, any 30-06 can be rebarreled to 35 Whelen. It is just a 30-06 sized up to 35 caliber so you don't even have to adjust the action. Or you could go 1 better and take it up to 9.3mm which equates to .366 caliber. That would basically give you a 9.3x62 which is an all time classic round. Additionally I have always thought a light fast handling double rifle in 7x57 or 9.3x74 would be ideal for timber. You can get 2 very quick shots and if you learn how to carry extra rounds in between your fingers you can get shots number 3 and 4 off quick as well. Most Americans have no experience with double rifles but they are incredible to use.
flags is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2019, 11:15 AM
  #13  
Giant Nontypical
 
salukipv1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: IL
Posts: 6,459
Default

Originally Posted by hardcastonly View Post
Ive always been rather amazed at the fact that the higher quality semi auto hunting rifles are not more popular
both my 270 win and 30/06 BAR's will consistently shoot every bit as tight groups as most bolt guns, with some loads,
I wish they were available in 35 whelen and 450 marlin calibers
It is available in .338 Win. Mag.
salukipv1 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-13-2019, 11:51 AM
  #14  
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 531
Default

Thank you!
yeah I just saw that, I thought that caliber option, was long dis-continued,
that may be on my next wish list, a 338 win with a 250 grain bullet is a well proven elk hunting combo
hardcastonly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-15-2019, 10:38 AM
  #15  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tug Hill NY
Posts: 371
Default

Way back in the 1800s when recreational deer hunting was really first taking off, I am thinking the more eastern states: Adirondacks, Maine, PA etc. where at least I am most familiar with, center fire rifles were largely lever actions....sure, there were centerfire Sharps, Spencers, etc. but they were in comparison quite heavy and in heavier calibers. Esp. the first smokeless cartridges like 30-30 were had in the light handy levers, and there were a bunch to choose from: Savage, Marlin, Winchesters, just off hand. Of course any rifle you shoot well can be a "deep woods " gun. 30-40 Krags were a favorite in our area, and are still occ. seen. Remington Semi and pump rifles have a strong following for a good reason. Myself, I was very partial to an ultra light Ruger bolt .308 for many years. Nothing makes the levers actually any "better " for the job, but historic timing and availability certainly comes into play. I must admit, I never feel more at home and happy than when I am carrying my model 94...it just feels so ...right.
Daveboone is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2019, 09:17 AM
  #16  
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 531
Default

Ive carried a dozen different rifles, and several calibers over the last 50 years,for hunting elk and mule deer and white tail deer,
everything from a ruger single shot 270 win, and browning BLR in caliber 257 roberts to a remington 700 in 458 win mag,
I favored my weatherby fiber-mark synthetic stainless 340 mag. and SAKO 375 H&H more than anything else.
my late hunting partner carried a browning BLR in caliber 358 win,
he spent a good deal of time kidding me and calling most of my rifles (##$$%% CANNONS)
and he never felt any urge too change.
the open secret is that they ALL worked just fine,
having confidence in what you carry, and being proficient in its use,
is far more important than the caliber you select,
I was just as successful with 270 win as the larger calibers,
and you certainly don,t need more power than a 270 win provides

but I always had more confidence in the 33-45 caliber rifles


458 win mag





450 marlin


35 whelen


375 H&H

Last edited by hardcastonly; 04-19-2019 at 09:28 AM.
hardcastonly is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2019, 05:02 PM
  #17  
Typical Buck
 
Jack Ryan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Mitchell Indiana
Posts: 833
Default

Originally Posted by Dave_Preston View Post
Is a bolt-action no good for timber?
A 500 yard gun is just as good for a 50 yard shot as any other gun, BUT a 150 yard gun like most lever actions may as well be left on the horse at 500 yards. So most people who own them don't want to call it just a plain low accuracy 150 yard gun. Instead they call it "woods gun" or "brush buster".
Jack Ryan is offline  
Reply With Quote

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service