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670 yard Mule Deer

Old 10-24-2013, 02:59 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by Bob H in NH View Post
It's simple. Nobody should be taking a really long shot, period, end of argument.

Notice that "long" is a relative term? There's to "long" for the weapon, be it a recurve, compound, shotgun, muzzleloader, rifle etc. and to "long" for the guy holding the weapon.

To you guys getting "close" at 200 yards, for me where I hunt that's as good as a country mile, the amount of places I can see 200 yards is almost nothing. In fact to find a gun range in this area with more than 125-150 yard range is pretty rare!

It's all relative. Nobody should shoot from "to far". Where that's defined by 1) Your skills and 2) the limits of your weapon.

Stay inside both of those and more power to you!

I'd love to learn long range shooting, I'd probably never need it in New England, but it would be fun to learn!
truer words were never spoken, setting distance limits for me, are up to me, and I set no ones limits but mine, I have a good grasp on what myself and my equipment are capable of. some folks just don't get it, I do not condone taking shot beyond a hunters ability, I will help them best I can, but it is up to each individual to know they're limitations.
and your right, long range shooting is a challenging and fun sport, but once your consistently putting a bullet on paper where it needs to be, if your doing it right you have several thousand dollars in equipment and expense, so why not put the ability to use in the hunting field. in 1981 I also thought shooting game at long range was a matter of luck, but I know better now, its the simpleist form of rocket science known to man, takes practice but its not that diffacult.
RR
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Old 10-24-2013, 03:52 PM
  #82  
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I don't think the question is, are you capable of making the shots. Not with me anyway.

My question is........is it hunting,or shooting?

Look at it this way. Lets say you take someone who's an expert target shooter. Lets even say he's an ex sniper. One of the best. However, he has never hunted.

Now set him on a high ridge, and tell him. Glass for an animal, and when you see one. Shoot it. He does it, and the animal is dead at 700 yds.

Is he a hunter, or a shooter? Look at it with an open mind from every-bodies view, and give us your answer.
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Old 10-24-2013, 04:04 PM
  #83  
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why does it matter so much to you? you hunt with peep sights, so do I at times, but there are times when in order to have a successful hunt I need to be able to cover a lot of realestate, or go home frustrated from rutting bucks running crazy never giving more than a fleeting glimpse of horn. some folks put a lot of emphasis on stalking and stillhunting, being 73% deaf from heretary hearing loss I'm not well suited to be successful at spitting distance on game, so I emphasize marksmanship in my hunting more that stalking/stillhunting, I hunt with the method that I'm best at and gives me more success.
RR
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Old 10-24-2013, 04:32 PM
  #84  
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muley, I have always saw your side, the problem we have is you refuse to see mine, I have never talked down to you for how you hunt, can you say the same?
in this pic am I a hunter or a shooter?

can it vary from day to day?
RR

Last edited by Ridge Runner; 10-24-2013 at 04:35 PM.
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Old 10-24-2013, 04:50 PM
  #85  
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Ok, I was just busting your chops, but I get carried away with that sometimes.

No harm meant. Yes, you're a hunter.



You have to admit though. My example of a non hunting sniper was more a shooter, than a hunter? That could happen, and he could have the elk on his wall.
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Old 10-24-2013, 05:16 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by Muley Hunter View Post
Ok, I was just busting your chops, but I get carried away with that sometimes.

No harm meant. Yes, you're a hunter.



You have to admit though. My example of a non hunting sniper was more a shooter, than a hunter? That could happen, and he could have the elk on his wall.
and that makes him a non-hunter? not a hunter who uses his strong points to be successful?
RR
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Old 10-24-2013, 05:29 PM
  #87  
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Back in the day I took a couple pals out to shoot some antelope. My friends and I trained together as LE snipers regularly. These boys were good. We all shot bucks at ridiculous ranges over the course of a week or so. These guys didn't hunt and would never have called themselves hunters. I was a lifelong hunter. None of what we did could be rightfully called hunting. We wanted to take some really hard shots and I knew where to find some really cool targets.

Hunting? Not hardly. That's the difference as I see it.

Could this same crew have hunted elk in dark timber and all taken a bull? Doubt it.
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Old 10-24-2013, 05:39 PM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by Ridge Runner View Post
and that makes him a non-hunter? not a hunter who uses his strong points to be successful?
RR


I guess it boils down to what are our personal definitions of hunting skills? Some think it's being good at glassing. Some say it's knowing where to put a tree stand. Some say it's tracking an animal. It goes on and on, and no one has the exact same list. So, we'll probably never agree.
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Old 10-24-2013, 06:08 PM
  #89  
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Originally Posted by Muley Hunter View Post
I guess it boils down to what are our personal definitions of hunting skills? Some think it's being good at glassing. Some say it's knowing where to put a tree stand. Some say it's tracking an animal. It goes on and on, and no one has the exact same list. So, we'll probably never agree.
your key words here
I guess it boils down to what are our personal definitions of hunting skills?
personal, whats to agree on? you use what works for you
RR
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Old 10-24-2013, 06:20 PM
  #90  
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Our definition of what we believe are hunting skills doesn't have to be the same as what we use. I can appreciate certain hunting skills, but don't use them.

This is what we believe, so there's no right,or wrong. It's sort of like what we like to eat. I could love what you hate.
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