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Share elk HUNTING advice

Old 07-23-2013, 09:06 AM
  #1  
Giant Nontypical
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Default Share elk HUNTING advice

I find that most topics focus on ancillary aspects of elk hunting (hunting gear often times) and not on the hunting itself. How about sharing some good advice about hunting the elk, leaving equipment issues out of it. I've hunted elk 3 times and taken two bulls. I know what boots to wear, what gun to shoot, how to train physically. What I still hunger to know more about is the art of finding the elk. Expert elk hunters, share your elk finding knowledge! Note, I'm not asking for the revelation of any honey holes but rather principles of finding elk. How would you find elk if you were transported to a different elk hunting territory that you had never hunted before, for example. If your advice is to scout, then how do you scout? Surely you don't cover all the ground, you select some of the ground to examine that you think most likely to contain elk. What is the recipe of this more promising ground?
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Old 07-23-2013, 06:59 PM
  #2  
Spike
 
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My suggestion would be to find a good spot to sit and glass and to be there before daylight. Elk in my experience don't really like flat ground and tend to stay away from heavy crowds of people.
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Old 07-24-2013, 02:21 PM
  #3  
Fork Horn
 
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Good topic...im wondering the same ...going on a DIY in new mexico mid september,,,,Alsatian feel free too inbox me any pointers boots..packs...training...1st time!!!
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Old 07-24-2013, 05:01 PM
  #4  
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Glass, glass, and glass some more. That's the best way to find elk. Like any animal they need water, food, and cover. Find a water source, dark timber for bedding, and food.
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Old 07-24-2013, 05:47 PM
  #5  
Fork Horn
 
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Lots of scouting. I start in October when most people are hunting rifle and have cameras out from Feb until September. By the time mid September comes either I know where I can find them or its going to be a long week.
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Old 07-24-2013, 05:52 PM
  #6  
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You don't hunt up elk in one day, unless you get lucky.


Get up high and glass, as was mentioned.


Spot where "most" of the animals are at and make a plan to slip into the area hopefully from above.


Settle in and call...............softly
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Old 07-24-2013, 07:15 PM
  #7  
Spike
 
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Glazing is the main key here, as for calling I pretty much let the elk decide on how much I call to them. If they seem to be rutting hard then just about any call will work as long it sounds some what like an elk. Just remember elk make a lot of different sounds and a lot of the calls you see on the market make too perfect sounds. Learn to different calls making different type of sounds. I find myself sitting and listening to elk a lot if I can't find away to get in on them. I also carry at least 2 different bugles with me and at least 3 different cow calls with me along with my favorite call is the mouth diaphragm calls. Now this is just based off my own personal experience that works for me, so you might try some of this stuff and make some of your own.
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Old 07-24-2013, 07:16 PM
  #8  
Spike
 
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Sorry I meant glassing stupid auto correct
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Old 07-25-2013, 03:24 AM
  #9  
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Glassing is certainly one of the primary tools, but figuring out where the hunting pressure will be is very important. Many careful plans have been ruined by the appearance of 4 wheelers on opening morning.
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Old 07-25-2013, 10:11 AM
  #10  
Spike
 
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When I start out looking at a new area I use either an online map or a an actual map, then I draw outlines around the hunting area, as many NatGeo maps and other brands don't have these boundaries. You hate to find an awesome spot only to realize its on the wrong side of the ridge. Next I look for large chunks of area that are untouched by roads. From there I look at cover, food, water and all the other necessities of elk habitat. Its not that you can't find elk next to roads (and its not that the most remote areas hold elk), but you do a lot to increase you chances the further you get from a road. If you are archery hunting elevation can play a key role as you get higher to negate the typically warmer weather. For late seasons look for lowlands as the elk bunch up in meadows down out of the steep country looking for food. Unfortunately most river bottom areas are private land, so find the fringe woods around these areas.
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