Go Back  HuntingNet.com Forums > General Hunting Forums > Big Game Hunting
Survival - when things don't go "as planned" >

Survival - when things don't go "as planned"

Big Game Hunting Moose, elk, mulies, caribou, bear, goats, and sheep are all covered here.

Survival - when things don't go "as planned"

Old 03-09-2010, 10:54 AM
  #21  
Spike
 
wog9f13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Anchorage Alaska
Posts: 27
Default

http://www.grannysstore.com/Wilderne...ntandsteel.htm

When I was a Scoutmaster I would always get one of these kits for each new boy that would come into my troop. We never carried lighters, and only 3 matches total. The whole purpose of this was to force the boys to learn that you can make a fire you just have to know how to do it.

The char cloth that you use with flint and steel is very important to have. I always make a bunch and have it with me whenever I am in the woods.
wog9f13 is offline  
Old 03-15-2010, 07:50 AM
  #22  
Typical Buck
 
rather_be_huntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Cedar Valley Utah
Posts: 977
Default

I understand that everyone has their own definition of survival gear and no two lists will be 100% the same but I gotta admit I don't understand the resistance to technology.

The GPS thing really shocks me. While I understand that one should know how to read a map and use a compass "just in case" a GPS is 1000 times better. There is no guess work and you know exactly where you are an how far you have to go. You even know (if your GPS was on) how you got there. If I park my vehicle I mark it and I always mark camp. Even if I fall and break my leg if I can establish communication (two way radio or cell) I can give coordinates to my location. If my friend falls and breaks his leg and I have to go get help I have exact coordinates to his location.

There may be some parts of the world where they aren't accurate or useful but I have yet to find that place. Nothing is perfect and you could easily drop it and break it....I get that....but they are a great survival tool in my opinion and I never leave home without it.

A two way radio is small enough you never notice it in your pack but still could be very useful in getting you out of jam. The weather reports may not always be accurate but heck it's better than not knowing at all. In some situations (especially if you have your GPS ) it may be better to travel and knowing the forecast could help you decide to stop and hunker down or tell you when you have a window of opportunity.

I agree that you shouldn't rely on them to save your life but I still don't get the resistance to it all. Doesn't make sense to me.
rather_be_huntin is offline  
Old 03-15-2010, 08:01 AM
  #23  
Typical Buck
 
rather_be_huntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Cedar Valley Utah
Posts: 977
Default

Originally Posted by charlie brown View Post
I have never tried a disposable lighter at high elevations, but it does make sense they won't work as well. Usually when I start a fire, I will put the carbons in "birds nest" and have a couple cottonballs handy. As soon as the carbon takes off, I throw in a couple cotton balls, and then the small tinder, etc.

As for making the carbons.
I guess it depends on your definition of "high elevation" but at 11,000 ft and less I have never had an issue with a disposable lighter not working at all.

I do carry wax tipped matches in a waterproof container and I carry a magnesium kit as well. But I gotta tell you it always cracks me up when we prepare for our backpack trips and my friends are saying how GPS's are overrated and there is no need to carry a two way radio and disposable lighter only to find when we are 4 miles from the nearest road they are asking me to borrow the lighter to start the fire, they ask me to turn on the radio for weather forecasts, and after hiking all afternoon hunting they want me to guide them back to camp or mark the site of a kill. I've evern used the GPS to track a wounded animal, I would mark last blood. Never ceases to amaze me.

Just because you are in a survival situation doesn't mean the GPS suddenly doesn't work. In the RARE case that it doesn't then you can turn to the map that you also have.
rather_be_huntin is offline  
Old 03-15-2010, 11:02 AM
  #24  
Fork Horn
 
skiking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Stumptown, MT
Posts: 152
Default

Originally Posted by rather_be_huntin View Post
The GPS thing really shocks me. While I understand that one should know how to read a map and use a compass "just in case" a GPS is 1000 times better.

There may be some parts of the world where they aren't accurate or useful but I have yet to find that place.

I agree that you shouldn't rely on them to save your life but I still don't get the resistance to it all. Doesn't make sense to me.
My biggest problem with them is that most people think, I have a GPS, it WILL tell me where I am every time I turn it on, and it WILL be accurate to +/- 100 ft even if they turn SA on. Those people then don't worry about packing a map and compass, and when they can't get a satellite fix, or one of the satellites they are using has a timing error, or the batteries die, they are up a creek without a paddle.

I have seen multipath errors of a 1/4 mile with a survey grade GPS that is accurate to +/- 0.02', if you don't think that your $100 Garmin is subject to the same error, then don't ever go into the woods relying on a GPS because you are one of the people that blindly pushes the "I BELIEVE" button.
skiking is offline  
Old 03-15-2010, 01:10 PM
  #25  
Typical Buck
 
rather_be_huntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Cedar Valley Utah
Posts: 977
Default

Originally Posted by skiking View Post
My biggest problem with them is that most people think, I have a GPS, it WILL tell me where I am every time I turn it on, and it WILL be accurate to +/- 100 ft even if they turn SA on. Those people then don't worry about packing a map and compass, and when they can't get a satellite fix, or one of the satellites they are using has a timing error, or the batteries die, they are up a creek without a paddle.

I have seen multipath errors of a 1/4 mile with a survey grade GPS that is accurate to +/- 0.02', if you don't think that your $100 Garmin is subject to the same error, then don't ever go into the woods relying on a GPS because you are one of the people that blindly pushes the "I BELIEVE" button.
You are absolutely right about many you things you say....again I get it. All I'm trying to say is that it's a great tool, not 100%, but not off enough to warrant not trusting it either. Your common sense should kick in if something doesn't look right....umm say like a printing error on your map. In all the years I've been using it in Utah I have never seen it be off more than 100ft or so. I know that because there have been many, many times walking out in the dark that it got me back to camp or the truck. I would've found my way anyway but the GPS got me there faster.

Yes I do carry a map just in case but I just don't think the "error" rate on a GPS is big enough to state that it's overrated insinuating that it's not a great survival tool. IMHO it's a wonderful survival tool.

Last edited by rather_be_huntin; 03-15-2010 at 01:27 PM.
rather_be_huntin is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.