Big Game Hunting Moose, elk, mulies, caribou, bear, goats, and sheep are all covered here.

backpacking

Old 02-22-2010, 04:57 PM
  #11  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 1,526
Default

Well since you will be wanting to do it quite a bit it will be wise to invest in quality products...so....i will cover the big three as these will be your most used items, and also the items that are easiest to save weight on.

1. Backpack
Crooked Horn, Badlands, Kifaru, and Eberlestock all make quality packs with a good warranty. Try all of them (with weight) and pick the one that fits you best....Kifaru packs are custom made for you so they will fit, and yes you pay a bit more for it.
For a week long trip you will probably want a pack somewhere in the 4,000cu inch range or larger.

2. Tents
There are a myriad of options here, but I prefer light and free standing, or a tarp and bivy sack. A tent I will recommend is the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2. Hard to beat a quality 2 person tent that weighs in at 2lbs 10oz. There are a ton of good tarps and bivy sacks out there....Cabelas actually makes a pretty good bivy sack too.

3. Sleeping Bag
Lots of good sleeping bags out there, made by a lot of different companies. Take a look at Marmot, North Face, Big Agnes, Western Mountaineering, and Golite.
You will need to decide whether to go with down or synthetic fill. Down is a bit lighter, but loses its insulating abilities when wet. Synthetic is a bit heavier but retains its insulating abilities.

This time of the year there are plenty of sales going on so if you shop hard you should be able to save quite a bit.
Hurricanespg is offline  
Old 02-23-2010, 08:55 AM
  #12  
Fork Horn
 
Muley70's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: beautiful western montana
Posts: 193
Default

I appreciate your concern over gear as it is a necessary componant of a back country back pack hunt. I have done several of these hunts and we have been successful in getting game as well. I think, however, you must give special consideration to the retreiving of an animal in the back country, and its removal. The physical demands are great, and a well thought out plan is neccessary.
I encourage everyone who is considering this kind of hunt to really appreciate what it takes to get an animal out without spoilage. This, I believe, should be your first consideration. I encourage to really think about this process and develop a plan. Always remember, your priority isn't to get the meat out, it is to get it cooled first. Once cooled and successfully stored, you then have days to get it out. We have taken three days in early season getting an elk out, without any spoilage.
Muley70 is offline  
Old 02-23-2010, 04:53 PM
  #13  
Fork Horn
 
glob3006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Niwot,Colo USA
Posts: 267
Default

Wow.....been away a while. But I couldn't resist responding.

Where are you from???MN? There are lot's of blanks to fill in.....Do you have a place to hunt? If so what kind of altitude are you looking at.

Have you been in the back country b-4?

Backpacks,Tent's and Sleeping bag's are important! But that's the easy part.

Backcountry hunting for a week in the Rockies's is not the same as backcountry camping over the wk'nd.

Do it right and you'll be hooked..........Do it wrong????

So fill Us in...Here to help.............Not discourage!

Bill
glob3006 is offline  
Old 03-01-2010, 05:33 AM
  #14  
Fork Horn
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Tug Hill NY
Posts: 420
Default

You are looking for a mountain of information, and when it comes to equipment, biases are very strong. Weight, functionality, quality all really come into play, but it all goes out the window without the experienced knowledge to use it.
Dont think what you want to bring, think what you need to bring.
Weight. What is easily carried an hour can be a nightmare after two. Then figure out how you are getting the animal out.
What can be shared? A tent can be split up between several people. Yup, you will be crowded, but the wt. and space in the pack could be the diff for an appropriate first aid kit, or spare socks.
Dont duplicate. Bring quality you can depend on. Bargain priced goods are for walmart and state parks.
You depend on your footwear. What is good for hunting in cold weather is highly unlikely to be close to appropriate for support and traction backpacking. Food. People balk at paying 10.00 for a dehydrated meal, but then spend the same daily for McDonalds.
Dont trust the water. Anywhere. Bring and use a good water filter/ purifier.
Dont depend on wood fires. They arent allowd many places, and are totally undependable and very poor for cooking. What if you are trapped in a tent for 2 days in a deluge? Invest in a quality backpacking stove, know how to use it, strip it, and repair it. And NEVER use it in your tent.
If you think you want to bring it because it is neat, leave it.
Practice on simple overnight trips, and practice with all your gear alot at home before leaving. Know cold how to use a map and compass, how to start fires with wet wood, (hypothermia is the biggest outdoor killer). Dont worry about a gps until you know how to use a compass oriented to a map. Get books out of the library on backpacking. Visit REI or Eastern Mountain Sports and tell them you are getting into the hobby.
Remember everything should fit inside your back pack, not strapped to the outside. Things loosen up and swing, and throw you off balance. rifles present a problem. You want to keep your hands free at all times. You are not hunting when your pack is on. Your hands must be free for balance and in case you slip and fall.
The book " Mountaineering" is a fantastic reference for all things specifically about mountain climbing, but it is probably the best reference last I knew about backpacking.
Daveboone is offline  
Old 03-01-2010, 06:44 AM
  #15  
Nontypical Buck
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,926
Default Newbie: Experiment in spring/summer

Without killing yourself. Don't try it out on a hunting trip.
Valentine is offline  
Old 03-01-2010, 07:46 PM
  #16  
Fork Horn
Thread Starter
 
slayer_54's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location:
Posts: 304
Default

well glob, i am from central MN and have never backpacked before, as stated before i plan on doing some 3-4 day trips in northern MN (duluth) to gain experience of the basics and work out kinks. the trip right is now is we are goin to idaho and it would be my brother and me out there, working on gettin two others out there. the other guys have been out there multiple times but i am not counting on them as i want to be as able as possible.
slayer_54 is offline  
Old 03-04-2010, 08:20 PM
  #17  
Fork Horn
 
glob3006's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Niwot,Colo USA
Posts: 267
Default

Read Daveboones reply again. He has some very valid points.

Be mindful of the time of year you will be hunting and the altitude involved. I live in Colorado and have seen snow in August at 10,000+ ft it typicly warms up off & on. I don't know about Idaho Someone else can speak on their conditions.
Dont' skimp on your sleeping bag! Alway's go for the colder rating if it say's 0* ....... Then it is probably comfy between 20 -25*...... I usually encounter between 18* and 30* at nite. So I have a -15* marmot bag.
A sleeping pad is also a MUST....I use a Thermorest....It is thin and lite but without it the cold get's you from the ground up + your shoulder's and back will thank you!You can find some "deals" ....Sierra trading post etc.

You can find good bargains on top quality gear if you look around.

I'll check back and you can pm me as well
More to cover......But gotta run!

GLOB
glob3006 is offline  
Old 03-04-2010, 08:35 PM
  #18  
Nontypical Buck
 
charlie brown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Crescent Valley, NV
Posts: 2,271
Default

If you have never back packed before, or elk hunted, I would work on one or the other in one year, not BOTH. If you are from MN, and going to ID for an elk hunt, you will be in for a big surprise when you see the mountains. What you would think shouldn't be too hard, will turn into a nightmare if you have never done it before. I would concentrate on hunting from a road camp, and hunting from that camp every day. A 700 lb elk 2, 3, or 10 miles from the truck is not your typical whitetail. Last year I shot a 600 lb cow about 1 mile from the truck. I carried out the 60lbs of loose meat in my pack, and am glad I was able to get the truck to her to get the rest out. She came out in 4 quarters, plus the loose meat. I figure if I am packing an elk quarter, at 1 mile per hour at best. If you are 5 miles from the trail head, and shoot an elk, that is 5 hours to get to the trailhead, with one quarter, and two hours to get back. At best you could get two quarters in one day. Double that, plus your camp, and the loose meat, and never doing it before, and you could be in real trouble real quick.

I have been hunting the mountains for about 12 years now. This winter I spent my first night out in a survival situation. Even with all the preparation and practicing I have done over the years, including trying out different gear, etc, it was still very mind numbing. The simplest tasks when out like that can become monumental if you don't have the experience, training, and equipment to do it right. I survived, and realized that it all has paid off.

Not trying to discourage you, but I don't think you realize exactly what you will be getting yourself into trying a backpack elk hunt when you have done neither before. Start with a truck camp first, and if push comes to shove, you can drive to town for a motel for the night if you need to. Hard to do that when you are back in, and realize you forgot something important.

Later,

Marcial
charlie brown is offline  
Old 03-04-2010, 08:38 PM
  #19  
Fork Horn
 
Muley70's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: beautiful western montana
Posts: 193
Default

Originally Posted by charlie brown
If you have never back packed before, or elk hunted, I would work on one or the other in one year, not BOTH. If you are from MN, and going to ID for an elk hunt, you will be in for a big surprise when you see the mountains. What you would think shouldn't be too hard, will turn into a nightmare if you have never done it before. I would concentrate on hunting from a road camp, and hunting from that camp every day. A 700 lb elk 2, 3, or 10 miles from the truck is not your typical whitetail. Last year I shot a 600 lb cow about 1 mile from the truck. I carried out the 60lbs of loose meat in my pack, and am glad I was able to get the truck to her to get the rest out. She came out in 4 quarters, plus the loose meat. I figure if I am packing an elk quarter, at 1 mile per hour at best. If you are 5 miles from the trail head, and shoot an elk, that is 5 hours to get to the trailhead, with one quarter, and two hours to get back. At best you could get two quarters in one day. Double that, plus your camp, and the loose meat, and never doing it before, and you could be in real trouble real quick.

I have been hunting the mountains for about 12 years now. This winter I spent my first night out in a survival situation. Even with all the preparation and practicing I have done over the years, including trying out different gear, etc, it was still very mind numbing. The simplest tasks when out like that can become monumental if you don't have the experience, training, and equipment to do it right. I survived, and realized that it all has paid off.

Not trying to discourage you, but I don't think you realize exactly what you will be getting yourself into trying a backpack elk hunt when you have done neither before. Start with a truck camp first, and if push comes to shove, you can drive to town for a motel for the night if you need to. Hard to do that when you are back in, and realize you forgot something important.

Later,

Marcial
+1, Solid post Charlie.
Muley70 is offline  
Old 03-23-2010, 12:47 PM
  #20  
Spike
 
wannaBelkhuntin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 34
Default

Being a flat lander your first day in the mountains will be breathtaking, and I am NOT talking the beauty of the Rockies. I mean the total lack of oxygen in the air. The first day or so the easiest of normal task can be hard. The truck camp is not a bad idea. You can still hunt Elk without the perils of being 8 miles back. There can be plenty of Elk within a mile or 2 of a truck camp. Plus you can do an overnight er or more if all is well. At 53 the thought of sleeping on the ground for a week or more is not very appealing to me. I have been doing this for 3 years, I haven't got a Bull yet but the opportunity has been there and I have seen some very big bulls. Also I have helped pack out a Bull. I thought I was tough until I did that. A boned rear quarter and all the backstraps and tenderloins on a pack frame is a lot of weight when in the steep and deep. If you go once you will go the rest of your life. Good Luck
wannaBelkhuntin is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Contact Us - Manage Preferences - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.