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Old 02-09-2019, 04:30 PM
  #18  
hardcastonly
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 710
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no I have yet too hunt the area around MARYLAND,
but I have hunted northern California in the warner wilderness,
WYOMING in several areas
idaho once
all over mid Colorado and the white river areas , meeker,eagle,gypsum,rifle, gunnison , and near woodland park, aspen etc.
dozens of years
some areas in northern MAINE up near paterson
and in florida several dozen, management areas
ocala, corbett,browns farm, bear island.....
(too many to remember them all)

keep in mind the basics remain constant, get the proper licences,
you first need too research the area regulations,
try to talk to game wardens and biologists several times prior to the season,areal photos help if current.
youll need to know what your hunting, and any limitations,
like shotguns only or 500 sq inches of orange in a vest and hat.
or limits on tree stands or vehicles camping or road access.
re-read the whole thread several times,you increase the odds by being alert and noting details
get a topo map, of the area, youll need to stay safe, warm, dry , you need decent boots and a day pack.
if available get a map marked with local property boundary lines
call the local fish and game office get current info, if you can find a local mentor so much better.
use your brain,look over the terrain and be aware that most deer will try to avoid roads and camp sites.
you need to know what the local game eats where it tends to bed, and be able to recognize potential feed like white oak,
wondering aimlessly hoping to see deer is a waste of effort in most cases , work smart not hard, if water is scarce, water holes are a used asset.
if theres a big camp site try to use the flood of foot traffic at dawn, to your advantage,
look for natural funnels like fenced highways or cliff faces that tend to force game traveling through an area too bunch up
look for escape routes. realize most hunters are adverse to putting in the effort to cross streams or climb steep embankments
some of the best areas may require wading a small stream or climbing a steep grade to gain access.
if you get a shot never assume you missed, even well hit deer can rush off as if totally untouched only to fall 50 yards into the tree line.
be aware of whats beyond the target, you don,t want a bullet to carry into property and cause damage.
get a decent cooler and bags of ice, youll need cold water or soda and if you score youll need to cool the venison.
a quality tree stand can be huge asset as can quality binoculars
If you intend to hunt the area regularly start a log book a and buy and use an accurate GPS.
log terrain, take pictures ,note game, vegetation, and time of day and date seen info
divide and label the area in your log, into 1/8 mile squares for reference



heres a quick memory jog list, for MY hunting day pack (you may not need everything but it may jog your memories or cause you too think.)
(remember you might be forced to stay out over night, & weather is unpredictable)
skinning knife
kukri
compact blade sharpener
compass
area topo maps
canteen
licences
cell phone (car charger and/or back-up batteries)
several lighters
several mil surplus trioxane heat tabs
granola bars
rain poncho
2 gallon zip lock bags
small block & tackle hoist & rope(50 ft parachute cord)
spare ammo
heavy hoodie jacket
large plastic tarp
aspirin
other meds
lip chapstick
water purification tablets, or filter/pump
down vest
gps
pack of wetnaps
toilet paper
emergency food
on your belt
large knife or light tomahawk, or kukuri
the cold steel (TRAIL MASTER, or ( KUKRI) are good choices
canteen

anything that could get screwed up if you fall in a creek like medicine, licences, cell phones etc. gets double zip loc bagged

Last edited by hardcastonly; 02-09-2019 at 05:36 PM.
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