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Old 06-05-2018, 03:12 AM
  #6  
hardcastonly
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Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: fla
Posts: 620
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you,ll want to have your hands free to carry the stand, and do other things at times,
and you may not want to place the rifle on wet ground,or lean it on a tree where it might fall,
hence the sling and ammo sleeve help.
proper practiced use of ,a sling helps rifle accuracy, a great deal on off hand, or sitting shots,
and you want ammo where its always accessible and your very unlikely to leave it home, by mistake,
or be forced too rummage through pockets or the pack to find it quickly.
its being careful , thinking about what might go wrong,and not making little mistakes that helps prevent larger issues
btw if you take a shot and the deer runs as if its not hit, be aware that even a mortally wounded deer can at times run 40-80 yards before dropping , never assume you missed!
deer are not difficult to kill if the shots well placed but that does not mean they all drop on bullet impact., your 308 win loaded with soft point 150-165 grain bullets will do a very good job provided you place shots well.

https://www.midwayusa.com/product/10...-swivels-nylon


http://marylandbucks.com/where-to-ai...hitetail-deer/

http://www.handloads.com/loaddata/default.asp?Caliber=308%20Winchester&Weight=All&ty pe=Rifle&Source=

https://www.speer-ammo.com/bullets/r...65-sptz-bullet
varget and WW748 powders, the speer 165 grain bullet and a 215 fed primer work well.


https://tpwd.texas.gov/education/hun...ifle-positions
The “Hasty Sling”



One way to steady shots when you don’t have rest is by using your rifle sling to create tension between your arm and the rifle. This technique is called the “Hasty Sling” and can be employed in each of the four shooting positions. As with the shooting positions, practice the Hasty Sling so you are confident using this technique.



If you are right handed, hold the rifle out with your right hand and let the sling hang down.



Place your left arm through the opening, above the sling and below the rifle.



Next, raise the left arm up and behind the sling.



Then slip your hand back over the sling and grasp the forestock of the rifle.



Shoulder the rifle as you normally would.



If the sling is at the correct length, the resulting tension created when you shoulder the rifle will steady your hold.



With the rifle held to the shoulder, the rear portion of the sling will cross your chest.



The sling will wrap around the outside of your left arm, near the elbow, pass over the crook of your arm and inside your forearm. The forward end of the sling will be on the back side of your left hand.

Your position should not be cramped or cause you to adjust. It should be comfortable and snug. If it is not, you will need to adjust the length of your sling.

Last edited by hardcastonly; 06-05-2018 at 06:06 AM.
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