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Old 05-23-2006, 06:59 AM   #1
 
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Default 8mm

My dad and i are talking about going on an elk hunt he would use his 8mm mauser. Does anyone have a load worked up that can work for elk
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Old 05-23-2006, 07:00 PM   #2
 
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Default RE: 8mm

8MM Mauser is a terrific Elk cartridge and there are zkillions of loads. Go here and take a look. Regards, Rick.

http://www.reloadersnest.com/frontpage.asp?CaliberID=78

I load the 175gr Sierra Pro hunter in mine for deer. For Elk, I would trend towards the 195gr Nosler partition. Good luck and regards, Rick.

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Old 05-23-2006, 09:25 PM   #3
 
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Default RE: 8mm

Thanks 48thguns the link looks very helpful and now i can try and see what the gun likes to shoot

thanks again
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Old 05-24-2006, 04:03 AM   #4
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Default RE: 8mm

what kind of mauser is it??? turkish, yugo, german etc. also what model?? K98, m24/47, M38 etc.?? Some 8mm mauser rifles were design for low pressure cartridges. note that there are two types of 8mm mauser ammo theres your typical 8mm mauser thens theres the 8mm mauser JS which if memory serves me right is the low pressure stuff. I know turkish mausers use the the low pressure stuff but not sure which else uses the low pressure ammo. I'm not a mauser expert by any means but I just know that some mausers wont handle the heavy loads and just wanted to give a heads up that you should be careful and find out what your rifle can or cannot do.

A year ago I was at the range and in the shooting stall next to me a gentleman was shooting a turkish mauser with heavy ball ammo after the 4th shot I begin to hear cussing coming from his stall I stopped shooting and peered over to see what the heck happened. he had minor burns and scratches on his left cheek and left arm the barrel and action burst in his face luckily he wasnt hurt bad (he was wearing eye protection thank goodness) it could have been worse.
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Old 05-24-2006, 02:52 PM   #5
 
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Default RE: 8mm

Its a german mauser
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Old 05-28-2006, 07:29 AM   #6
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Default RE: 8mm

"8mm mauser JS which if memory serves me right is the low pressure stuff."

No, you've got this BACKWARDS! The JS (InfanterieSpitzgeschoss, or infantry pointed bullet) ammo is the round adopted by the Krauts in 1903. It was loaded with a lighter, faster, pointed bullet as opposed to the earlier round that used a 236-grain round-nose slug at a much lower MV (and pressure level).

FYI:

What does "8X57 JS" mean??

The "J" is an "I"! It means "INFANTRY" The "S" stands for "spitzgeschoss", or "pointed bullet". What happened was this:

The original Model 1888 German infantry rifle and the M98's, up to 1905, used ammunition with .318" diameter bullets-the original was called "8X57J". Strangely, (to our way of thinking) the actual bore diameter of these rifles was .322" to .323" despite the fact that they were shooting .318" bullets in them!! (Believe it or don't! Many early European smokeless powderrifles were shot with UNDERSIZED BULLETS!!) So, when the Krauts changed to the 154-grain POINTED BULLETS in their rifle ammo in 1905, they also started making the bullets full-groove diameter, (.323"), and called them "pointed", "spitzer", or "S" bullets.

To shoot this ammo with the bigger bullet in older rifles, they found some of them had to have the CHAMBER THROAT diameter reamed up a little over the previous dimesion so the case would freely release the bullet on firing. Rifles so altered were stamped with a big "S" on the receiver ring. Note that, contrary to some stories, the entire bore diameter of these converted "S" stamped rifles was NOT changed, because .322" to .323" was the dimension they had always been!

HOWEVER, many civilian-made 8X57mm rifles made during this era DID, IN FACT, USE .318" groove diameter barrels! These civilian "J" bore guns should indeed be used with .318" bullets only, but this caution does not apply to German military 8X57 "J" rifles that have altered chambers! (Some later manufactired COMMERCIAL 8X60, and other 8mm rifles as well, also had .318" rather than .323" bores. So ANY COMMERCIAL/CUSTOM barreled 8X57mm, 8X60mm, or 8X64mm, etc., rifle should be checked to see what the actual groove diameter is before firing!

For example, I have an 8X60Rmm J.P. Sauer double-barreled rifle that was made around 1912. It is marked "7,8 X 57R" under the barrels. This "7,8X57R" marking is X-ed out, and it is restamped 8X60R. The implication here ("7,8") is that this rifle is a .318" size. BUT slugging the barrels show the groove diameter of each to be .322", and the cases do release .323" bullets when fired, so I use them. This rifle was altered by rechambering in 1944 to 8X60R, but there was nothing done to the bores. It was merely rechambered to use the 60mm case, so it obviously had .322" grooves from day 1, just like the German military rifles.
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Old 05-28-2006, 02:40 PM   #7
 
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Default RE: 8mm

Quote:
A year ago I was at the range and in the shooting stall next to me a gentleman was shooting a turkish mauser with heavy ball ammo after the 4th shot I begin to hear cussing coming from his stall I stopped shooting and peered over to see what the heck happened. he had minor burns and scratches on his left cheek and left arm the barrel and action burst in his face luckily he wasnt hurt bad (he was wearing eye protection thank goodness) it could have been worse
What kind of Turk was it? A 98, or one of the 1893s converted from 7.65?
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:12 AM   #8
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Default RE: 8mm

Quote:
ORIGINAL: eldeguello

"8mm mauser JS which if memory serves me right is the low pressure stuff."

No, you've got this BACKWARDS! The JS (InfanterieSpitzgeschoss, or infantry pointed bullet) ammo is the round adopted by the Krauts in 1903. It was loaded with a lighter, faster, pointed bullet as opposed to the earlier round that used a 236-grain round-nose slug at a much lower MV (and pressure level).

FYI:

What does "8X57 JS" mean??

The "J" is an "I"! It means "INFANTRY" The "S" stands for "spitzgeschoss", or "pointed bullet". What happened was this:

The original Model 1888 German infantry rifle and the M98's, up to 1905, used ammunition with .318" diameter bullets-the original was called "8X57J". Strangely, (to our way of thinking) the actual bore diameter of these rifles was .322" to .323" despite the fact that they were shooting .318" bullets in them!! (Believe it or don't! Many early European smokeless powderrifles were shot with UNDERSIZED BULLETS!!) So, when the Krauts changed to the 154-grain POINTED BULLETS in their rifle ammo in 1905, they also started making the bullets full-groove diameter, (.323"), and called them "pointed", "spitzer", or "S" bullets.

To shoot this ammo with the bigger bullet in older rifles, they found some of them had to have the CHAMBER THROAT diameter reamed up a little over the previous dimesion so the case would freely release the bullet on firing. Rifles so altered were stamped with a big "S" on the receiver ring. Note that, contrary to some stories, the entire bore diameter of these converted "S" stamped rifles was NOT changed, because .322" to .323" was the dimension they had always been!

HOWEVER, many civilian-made 8X57mm rifles made during this era DID, IN FACT, USE .318" groove diameter barrels! These civilian "J" bore guns should indeed be used with .318" bullets only, but this caution does not apply to German military 8X57 "J" rifles that have altered chambers! (Some later manufactired COMMERCIAL 8X60, and other 8mm rifles as well, also had .318" rather than .323" bores. So ANY COMMERCIAL/CUSTOM barreled 8X57mm, 8X60mm, or 8X64mm, etc., rifle should be checked to see what the actual groove diameter is before firing!

For example, I have an 8X60Rmm J.P. Sauer double-barreled rifle that was made around 1912. It is marked "7,8 X 57R" under the barrels. This "7,8X57R" marking is X-ed out, and it is restamped 8X60R. The implication here ("7,8") is that this rifle is a .318" size. BUT slugging the barrels show the groove diameter of each to be .322", and the cases do release .323" bullets when fired, so I use them. This rifle was altered by rechambering in 1944 to 8X60R, but there was nothing done to the bores. It was merely rechambered to use the 60mm case, so it obviously had .322" grooves from day 1, just like the German military rifles.
Like I said Im no expert when it comes to mausers, just new there different types of 8mm ammo. Im glad someone with more knowledge was able to explain it more thorough for SCOTT78

Also to Charley I have no idea what kind of turkish mauser it was, I didnt go into alot of details with the gentleman, he was in a hurry to pack up his stuff and go back to the shop where he had bought the rifle from. from my memory of that day my best guess would be it was a 98. also he was shooting S&B 8x57JS. maybe it was the ammo I know S&B seems to load their ammo a little hot.
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:39 AM   #9
 
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Default RE: 8mm

Thanks for the info so far guys it been great. His is a WWII era 98 and he bought the barrel and the action in the early 70's for like next to nothing and made a stock for it. He has reloaded for it before.It uses the .323 bullet. i am just looking for some powder and bullet combos that may work nicely for elk
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Old 05-30-2006, 06:24 PM   #10
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Default RE: 8mm

I load 43 to 46of 3031 to push a 185 remington corelock, should work for elk also the 180 nosler should work. As far as the "turk" blowing up there are far to many varibles to blame the gun without knowing, all the turks I have but one have had a good reciever, one was badly abused and it's put up for the future junk heap. Did the guy just buy it, did he clean the comoline out of it, was the previous bullet a dud and the bullet stuck in the barrel and about a million other reasons it could of happened. Don't sweat the strength of the reciever/gun, if in doubt have it checked by a good smith.
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