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Old 06-13-2017, 05:42 AM   #1
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Default Trump to Tout Training, Apprenticeships

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Trump to Tout Training, Apprenticeships

Andrew Soergel June 12, 2017, at 3:27 p.m.
President Donald Trump the onetime host of reality TV show "The Apprentice" will have apprenticeships on the mind again as he kicks off the White House-dubbed "workforce development week" with a Tuesday trip to Wisconsin, before unveiling what's being billed as a major policy announcement.

Trump's daughter and aide, Ivanka Trump, appeared Monday morning on "Fox & Friends" to tease the president's schedule for the week, which includes a trip to Waukesha County Technical College in Pewaukee, Wisconsin.

"We're visiting one of the great examples of skill-based learning and skills-based education, a technical school in Wisconsin, which we're very excited about, to talk about the skills gap and to really highlight the fact that there is a viable path other than a four-year college experience," Ivanka Trump said. "There are 6 million available American jobs. So we're constantly hearing from CEOs that they have job openings, but they don't have workers with the skillset they need to fill those jobs."

The White House's push to bring skills training to the forefront comes on the heels of Trump's "infrastructure week," which featured the president proposing to privatize air traffic control and announcing the creation of a government council and online dashboard that may already exist.

Ivanka Trump will join the president and Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta in Wisconsin, where they'll meet up with GOP Gov. Scott Walker. Meetings with business executives and state governors and a Wednesday presidential announcement related to workforce development are expected to further underscore the week's theme.

Among other things, Trump on Wednesday is expected to announce directives aimed at emphasizing and reorganizing government job-training programs, which would come after his budget was criticized by some for redirecting federal dollars that would've helped fund the Labor Department and skills-related initiatives.


But Reed Cordish, an assistant to the president, said at an event last week hosted by Business Roundtable that the problem isn't the amount of money given to the 43 federal job-training programs, which collectively account for about $16.7 billion a year in funding.

Cordish said the issues are the "accountability and effectiveness" of those programs, which the White House feels may warrant consolidation or budget-slashing.

"The president believes so strongly in the power and the need for people to learn a great skill," Cordish said, indicating that this can most effectively be accomplished when "businesses team with community colleges and vocational schools" and not, necessarily, when the federal government takes charge.

Cordish went on to preview Trump's Wednesday policy announcement, saying the president would use the opportunity to call for a "further partnership with Congress." Details of what the White House hopes to put forward remain unclear, though Acosta during a White House press briefing Monday said Trump planned to make an "important announcement regarding apprenticeships this week."


"An apprenticeship combines a paid-work component with an educational component," Acosta said. "Apprentices earn while they learn, and in the process they largely avoid the substantial student debt that you see with higher education today."

Trump previously has expressed support for Germany's apprenticeship model, and his budget called for $90 million to go toward apprenticeship programs. Acosta said those hoping to learn more about the White House's stance on apprenticeships would have to "stay tuned and listen to the Wednesday announcement," though the administration hoped to broadly expand apprenticeship opportunities "across the board" to "all people, all industries."

"Every CEO that I have spoken with has made a personal commitment to pursuing these. The CEOs are excited," Acosta said.

And although Ivanka Trump was also light on details during her Monday morning appearance, she did praise specific legislation under consideration on Capitol Hill that would help fund certain education and training programs by reauthorizing the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act, which was last reauthorized in 2006.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have been working in recent months to lock down the law's reauthorization, with a focus on promoting skills-based education programs and those centered around the STEM areas of science, technology, engineering and math.

"It's a very good piece of legislation. They're refining it and extending it, but it's all about skills-based education and making sure people have the technical skills to succeed in this modern economy," Ivanka Trump said.

The bill to bring back the Perkins Act, known as the Strengthening Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century Act, was approved by the House Committee on Education and the Workforce last month. It's been supported by Republicans and Democrats, as well as employers in the private sector hoping to have a say in the skills their prospective employees learn in schools and technical programs.

"With Perkins, one of the simple things it does is say the community colleges, for example, need to teach curriculums that are available in the market that people will hire. A simple thing like that makes a big difference," Ginni Rometty, chairman, president and CEO of IBM, said at the Business Roundtable event last week.

Among other things, the reauthorization bill would give states more leeway on what programs and initiatives they can funnel government dollars to. Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., said last week it was important to have that flexibility included in the reauthorization bill so "the Department of Education and the secretary cannot constrain progress."

"What the goal, I think, is is to make sure we move those responsibilities to the states so that the workforce in the state is being matched to the employment opportunities in that state," he said, noting he wants to ensure Washington doesn't have "an outsized role" in the skills-training conversation
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Old 06-14-2017, 05:06 AM   #2
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I am hopeful that this comes to pass and functions as they hope. All these criminal justice and social worker degrees, plus others are not finding jobs. A neighbor's son went to an auto school near Nashville after high school. Initially he worked as a mechanic for a large construction company in Northern VA. Went in debt to buy an established repair garage in a rural WV town about 5 years ago. Probably grossed over $250k last year. My wife was a teacher here in WV with a Masters plus 45 hrs. It would have taken her 5+ years to earn that amount. Wish she had gone to auto repair school, LOL.
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Old 06-14-2017, 05:34 AM   #3
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I agree, technical schools are the direction many should go instead of college to get something like a woman's or a black study degree.
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Old 06-14-2017, 05:43 AM   #4
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4 or 5 years ago as I was doing my stint at the area Chamber of commerce board of directors we had a breakfast with our Democrat senator from wi. Ron Kind---one question he asked us what we would propose to see in our state and country I told him to push technical school trades and Apprenticeships, which have long been forgotten about---he quickly changed the subject and never brought it up again. Not at the breakfast or in any legislation or even discussions----Now that Governor Walker and pres are talking about it he thinks its a great idea he should have thought about before ?????????????????????????????????????????????????? ??? Stupid Dems
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Old 06-14-2017, 06:05 AM   #5
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In addition to being a pathway to a good livelihood the young folks would not be exposed to all the leftist professors at the colleges trying to pervert their minds.
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Old 06-14-2017, 06:45 AM   #6
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Agreed, I say it like this, let GM, Yamaha, Ford, etc. hire the higher degreed engineers to design the new technology. Let the trade schools, apprentices, etc. fill in the mechanics duties in the shops. There is no reason to make a working system anymore complicated.
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Old 06-14-2017, 03:55 PM   #7
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I'm currently working on an electrical project at a local university and been thinking about this topic. We need trained trade workers as much as degree holding engineers. I wonder how many of these students will be wasting their time and someone's money attending college instead of doing a trade school.

People can find jobs in the skilled trades that can compete with some college educated jobs. The only difference I see is a level of favouritism that comes from educators promoting college as the only way to go in life.

I remember when my older kids had to pick classes at 9th grade. The superintendent spend 1 1/2 hours talking about college and 1 minute discussing military and trade options. In my opinion too many are pushed to college because they are told to. Many don't graduate, some can't find jobs, and now we have a severe liberal situation attacking American rights and values.
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Old 06-14-2017, 04:02 PM   #8
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No doubt about it!
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Old 06-14-2017, 07:29 PM   #9
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Best option for kids these days is BOTH! Get a degree, even just an AS/AA and then find a good trade of their interest and get trained.

Just having one doesn't cut it anymore.
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Old 06-14-2017, 10:57 PM   #10
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Ive found that I need 3 things to succeed. Health, work ethic, and drive.
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